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Angry protests have broken out in Kyrgyzstan after a woman was abducted and killed in a case of “bride kidnapping”.The illegal abduction of women for marriage is thought to be widespread in the country. : worldnews From “World News”



On April 5, several men abducted 27-year-old Aizada Kanatbekova in broad daylight in Kyrgyzstan’s capital, Bishkek. One of them had allegedly been stalking her for months. Two days later, a farmer found Kanatbekova’s body in a car outside Bishkek. Police confirmed she was strangled to death. They said the body of one of her abductors was also in the car, displaying stab wounds that were self-inflicted.Kidnapping women for marriage is a crime in Kyrgyzstan, but men abduct women regularly and with impunity. Kanatbekova’s mother said police had laughed off her plea for help after the abduction and told her she’d soon be dancing at her daughter’s wedding. It’s a stark example of the disregard police exhibit when it comes to reports of bride kidnapping. Their inaction is particularly shocking in Kanatbekova’s case because a witness alerted police immediately after the abduction. Street cameras installed as part of Bishkek’s “Safe City” project captured the license plates of both cars.The case is similar to that of Burulai Turdaly kyzy, a young woman who was murdered by her two-time kidnapper in May 2018, after officers left them alone together in a room at the police station. There is a prevailing belief in Kyrgyz society that bride kidnapping, forced marriages, and other forms of domestic violence are a family affair and outsiders, even police, should not meddle, even though they are criminal offenses.https://www.hrw.org/news/2021/04/09/another-woman-killed-scourge-kyrgyzstan-bride-kidnappings







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Olympics: ‘The Taliban wouldn’t let me cycle because I’m a woman’ From “BBC News – World”



Afghan cyclist Masomah Ali Zada is hoping to compete in the Tokyo Olympics as part of the Olympic Refugee Team. She left Afghanistan with her family in 2016, because of the social pressures she faced as a woman cyclist and fear of violence from the Taliban. She is now living in France, where her family has been granted asylum. During Taliban rule in the 1990s, girls were discouraged from going to school and women were not allowed to work. The Afghan government and its allies have since continued to fight the Taliban. In recent months there has been a rise in targeted attacks on civilians by Taliban fighters, particularly women in the public eye. Video produced by Daniel South, Jasmin Souesi and Alex Capstick.







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Scotland elects first woman of colour to Scottish parliament | Scotland From “World news | The Guardian”



History was made in Scotland on Saturday as the country elected its first woman of colour to serve as a member of the Scottish parliament (MSP).Kaukab Stewart won her race for the Scottish National Party (SNP) in the Glasgow Kelvin constituency, describing the achievement as an “honour”.“It is without doubt an honour to be elected as the first woman of colour to the Scottish parliament,” Stewart said in her acceptance speech on Saturday.“It has taken too long, but to all the women and girls of colour out there: the Scottish parliament belongs to you too, so whilst I may be the first, I will not be the last.“I intend to be a voice for every single person in Kelvin that I’ve been elected to represent. Whether you voted for me or not, please know my door will always be open.”The Scottish first minister, Nicola Sturgeon, praised the historic win, saying she “could not be prouder right now”.“I am thrilled beyond words to see Kaukab Stewart elected. Party politics aside, this is a special and important moment. It has taken far too long, but @kaukabstewart is the first woman of colour to be elected to the Scottish parliament,” she tweeted.Party politics aside, this is a special and important moment. It has taken far too long, but @kaukabstewart is the first woman of colour to be elected to the Scottish Parliament. I could not be prouder right now. https://t.co/0mLToFErwh— Nicola Sturgeon (@NicolaSturgeon) May 8, 2021
Stewart beat the co-leader of Scottish Greens, Patrick Harvie, to take over the seat from Sandra White, also of the SNP. Stewart won 14,535 votes, compared with 9,077 for Harvie.As the regional list seats were allocated into the early evening, Scottish Labour’s Pam Duncan-Glancy became the first permanent wheelchair-using MSP, representing Glasgow region. Duncan-Glancy told reporters: “I promise to do everything in my power to make sure that the path for the next disabled and permanent wheelchair-using MSP is nowhere near as hard as it has been for the first.”She congratulated Stewart describing it as a “fantastic result”. “It really has been an incredibly special day for equalities.”







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Israel accuses Spanish woman of aiding banned militant group From “Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines”



Israel accuses Spanish woman of aiding banned militant group







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Woman in Vietnam dies from anaphylaxis after receiving AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine – health ministry — RT World News From “RT World News”



A 35-year-old female medical worker in Vietnam has died from anaphylaxis after being injected with AstraZeneca’s Covid-19 vaccine, in a “very rare” case of adverse reaction to the drug, the country’s health ministry has announced.

The woman, who was a member of staff at the Tan Chau Regional General Hospital in the southern An Giang province, died from anaphylaxis on Friday. She received her first dose of the Anglo-Swedish jab at the hospital on Thursday morning and subsequently died from anaphylactic shock.“This is a very rare case in the vaccination against Covid-19,” the ministry said in the statement.

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‘Less democratic’ Asian nations satisfied with govt Covid response as public opinion in Europe suffers ‘severe downturn’ – study

As of Friday, more than 747,800 people in Vietnam had been administered AstraZeneca’s Vaxzevria vaccine, according to health ministry data.Confirmation of the death comes as Vietnam, which has previously contained outbreaks of the coronavirus quickly, is currently facing a slight uptick in Covid-19 cases, including in the capital Hanoi.On Friday, the southeast Asian country registered 46 new infections, with 24 in Hanoi, according to the health ministry. The latest cases bring Vietnam’s total so far in the pandemic to 3,137, with 161 cases discovered since the country’s most recent outbreak started on April 27.

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Covid-cautious Vietnam to build 3 field hospitals after first virus outbreak in 55 days

Anaphylaxis has been reported as a potential side effect of AstraZeneca’s vaccine by the drug regulatory authorities in the EU and in the UK.Some 590 cases of allergic reactions associated with anaphylaxis or anaphylactoid response had been reported in the UK as of May 6, according to the country’s Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). By April 28, an estimated 22.6 million people in the UK had received a first dose of AstraZeneca’s vaccine, while 5.9 million had received both doses, the agency said.Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!







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Why New Zealand’s foreign minister is her own woman | Politics News From “Al Jazeera – Breaking News, World News and Video from Al Jazeera”



Wellington, New Zealand – Nanaia Mahuta was only 11 when she first stood up for her political beliefs.
Mahuta was one of 30 Māori and Pacific Island students at an all-girls Anglican school and the South African rugby team was touring New Zealand, dividing the country in the process.
While the schoolgirl had no idea of what was soon to become one of the largest civil disturbances in New Zealand history, she could not stomach the fact her school had offered to host a group of South African students – a decision she felt validated apartheid.
Rather than simply “dealing with it”, she skipped school in protest.
“As a Māori woman there is an embedded sense of social justice, and striving for equality of opportunity and Indigenous advancement,” she told Al Jazeera.
“If you’ve been brought up in a Māori community you will have experienced some form of mistreatment and at an extreme level – racism.”
The daughter of Sir Robert Te Kotahitanga – the adopted son of Māori King Koroki – Mahuta grew up assisting her father in key treaty negotiations.
She has spent almost half her life in Parliament, having first won a seat at the age of 26.
In 2016, Mahuta became the first woman to display a moko kauae (sacred facial tattoo) in Parliament, and last year chalked up another first – becoming New Zealand’s first female foreign minister.
The 50-year-old’s appointment was a surprise, according to political commentator Ben Thomas.
“Foreign affairs ministers tend to be seen as a ‘gold watch’ for long service, or it’s given as favour to friends and allies,” he said. “Mahuta doesn’t fit into that category and there’s no sort of sense that [the prime minister] owes her anything.”
Mahuta is proud of being Māori and says that as a Māori woman she has an ’embedded sense of social justice, and striving for equality of opportunity and Indigenous advancement’ [File: Eraldo Peres/AP Photo]Mahuta is seen as an unassuming character and, despite her longevity in politics, has never been in the spotlight. Nor have ego and ambition defined her career, unlike her predecessors or politicians generally, Thomas says.
The position of foreign minister, which she holds in addition to responsibilities for local government and Māori affairs, came as a surprise for Mahuta too.
Although she had previously held the associate trade and export portfolios in Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern’s government, Mahuta was more focused on domestic issues in her role as cabinet minister for local government and Māori development.
Thomas says former foreign ministers “have traditionally talked a big game” when it comes to human rights, but they have been notoriously reticent about trading partners, particularly since the country’s biggest free trade agreement with China in 2006.
‘The real deal’
Mahuta made waves internationally by joining Australia, Canada, Britain, and the United States in condemning the disqualification of pro-democracy politicians in Hong Kong and questioning Beijing’s crackdown in a territory that was guaranteed considerable freedoms and autonomy on its return to Chinese rule in 1997.
She also condemned opposition leader Alexey Navalny’s detention in Russia and suspended bilateral high-level contacts with Myanmar in response to the military’s February 1 coup, saying that New Zealand did not “recognise the legitimacy of the military-led government”.
But last month, Mahuta’s comments on the “Five Eyes” intelligence alliance raised eyebrows after she said she would not let the US-led alliance dictate New Zealand’s bilateral relationship with China.
While she acknowledged China and New Zealand might have disagreements, she said in an April speech at the New Zealand China Council that the country needed to be “respectful” of one of its major trading partners.
“There will be some areas on which it’s useful to coordinate through the Five Eyes platform; but there will be other areas – human rights for example – where we want to look to building a broader coalition of countries to take positions on issues of common interest,” she told Al Jazeera.
“[A]t times we work with a bigger group; other times we join with one or two other like-minded partners; and at times, we make our own statements.”
Fellow Labour Party politician Paul Eagle went to university with Mahuta where she was studying for a master’s degree in social anthropology and Māori business development. They are related and both hail from the same tribe, Tainui.
Mahuta, seen here in Australia, has a background in mostly domestic affairs and was previously minister of Māori development and local government [File: Bianca De Marchi/Pool Photo via AP Photo]Eagle notes that Mahuta has always taken on the people-focused portfolios and that her ability to endure conflict and maintain relationships is the key to her success.
“What you see is what you get,” he said. “People often underestimate her but she’s incredibly smart and strategic. She’s the real deal.
“While other politicians have come and gone, Nanaia has weathered many storms and she’s managed to get people on board in the process.”
Experts say Mahuta’s Māori background could also be an asset in her role as foreign minister.
She is used to arguing for the weaker party – be it on the Treaty of Waitangi settlement, or representing the Māori caucus – a minority in the ruling Labour Party, and has honed her powers of negotiation.
“Anything achieved has to have been done through diplomacy and she doesn’t have delusions of grandeur like her predecessors who pledged to bring peace in the Middle East and dominance in the Pacific,” Thomas said.
“One of the defining characteristics of New Zealand is its own relationship with indigeneity. All things being equal and outside of tokenism, I think it’s a benefit to have a Māori woman representing the country on the world stage.”
No compromise
Mahuta says she did not expect to get such a significant portfolio so soon but was “delighted” to have the job.

“If I can offer anything, it would be to draw on a bicultural foundation and context to influence foreign policy,” she said. “I hope to elevate those relationships for greater cohesion and prosperity for future generations.
“We have an opportunity as a young and maturing nation to show how our journey towards a more inclusive society has been shaped by the Treaty [of Waitangi] discourse and experience. Much of our history is born from conflict and any gains have been hard-fought and incremental. I think we can offer that journey and learn from it – not as a solution but as an evolving process.”
She cites the revival of the Māori language as an example.
Where New Zealand once sought to eradicate the language entirely, and assimilation was thought to be best practice, now the Māori language is embedded in schools and public environments and is part of the fabric of New Zealand identity, she says.
Māori were only given the right to vote in 1879.
In the current Parliament, 15 of the 120 representatives – colloquially known as the “First 15” –  are Māori, and the house is more diverse than ever, she says.
In her role as local government minister, Mahuta is also looking to extend Māori representation in local councils, with her “Māori ward” policy under which the government will support municipalities that want to establish specific Māori representation, abolishing a law that allowed such decisions to be vetoed in a referendum.
Mahuta was the first woman to display a moko kauae (sacred facial tattoo) in Parliament [Sasha Borissenko/Al Jazeera]“Having Māori representation where their voices and perspectives could be accounted for has now permeated through to the local government sphere and private sector,” Mahuta said. “Māori representation has led to inclusion strategies across the board.”
Ruahina Albert is the chief executive of Waikato Women’s Refuge.
She first met Mahuta 30 years ago when the refuge was just a two-bedroom unit in Hamilton, a city in New Zealand’s North Island.
“When she came in to meet us in the 90s we weren’t sure who she was, but we were struck by how compassionate, helpful, and bubbly she was,” Albert said.
Twenty-five ministers over 36 years have visited the premises but Mahuta has been one of the most effective, she says.
Mahuta was a member of the board for three years before being made a minister, and Albert hopes she will return once she leaves Parliament.
“We work on the front line for sexual violence and family violence. We’re a tough bunch and not much gets past us. We don’t trust the government but we trust her.
“I believe her heart is with her people and her community, she’s clear about identifying what she will and will not compromise. You always have those conflicts when you’re working within a system but I don’t see her compromising her people or her country. It’s her heart and her future.”







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Did agents raid home of wrong woman over Jan. 6 riot? Maybe. From “Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines”



ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — “We’re looking for Nancy Pelosi’s laptop,” FBI agents told Marilyn Hueper after briefly handcuffing her.Hueper shot back: “That still doesn’t explain why you’re in my home. Or in Homer, Alaska.”The search for the House speaker’s laptop had taken a U.S. Capitol Police officer thousands of miles away from home for an FBI raid on Hueper’s home, looking for something stolen during the Jan. 6 insurrection — and the person who did it.The agents would walk out of Hueper’s home with iPads, cellphones and a pocket-sized copy of the Declaration of Independence. They took a laptop, but it wasn’t from Pelosi’s office. And it’s possible they may have the wrong person altogether — even though Hueper looks strikingly similar to the thief.The Justice Department’s massive prosecution of those who stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 has not been without its problems, including this potential instance of mistaken identity. And as Republicans are increasingly seeking to minimize the insurrection and play down the horror of the day, any missteps by federal prosecutors could be used in that effort to discredit what actually happened.Federal prosecutors have charged more than 400 people, the largest undertaking by the department, including scores of defendants who posted images of their crimes online and boasted about breaking into the hallowed building. Some are facing serious charges and considerable prison time.Hueper and her husband first came to officials’ attention this year when Alaska Airlines in February banned the couple for refusing to wear masks on a flight, according to court documents obtained by The Associated Press. Then two other people called in tips saying they recognized Hueper in photos that authorities had released of suspects wanted for storming the Capitol.The insurrectionists sought to disrupt the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory. Hundreds of officers were injured and five people died after the riot, including a Capitol Police officer.Story continuesSupporters of then-President Donald Trump ransacked offices, rifled through lawmakers’ papers and desks, smashed through glass, shattered windows and tore down signs. Among the items stolen: the laptop from Pelosi’s office, her lectern, an iPad belonging to Majority Whip Rep. Jim Clyburn and other electronics.But the volume of people inside the Capitol building, along with the lack of arrests made at the time of the riot, has made it difficult to identify people, even with the glut of social media evidence. Federal agents have dug through thousands of social media posts, gotten sweeping warrants to obtain information on cellphones in the area of the Capitol, used facial recognition tools and obtained logs of devices that signed into the congressional Wi-Fi during the riot.But by far the most effective tool for federal agents has been old-fashioned tips. Many of the rioters have been ratted out by their friends and family members.The warrant, obtained by the AP, identifies Hueper as the woman who took the laptop.But they’re wrong, Hueper insists. She told the AP that another woman wearing her same coat and with a similar hairstyle was inside the Capitol during the insurrection, not her. She admits she was in Washington, D.C., for Trump’s rally that day but says she didn’t get any closer than 100 yards (91 meters) from the Capitol and spent part of the day being lost in an unfamiliar city.She said agents showed her one photo of the woman inside the Capitol, and they looked so similar that Hueper wondered if someone had used photo-editing software to put her in the photograph.The warrant details how FBI agents located an image showing Hueper wearing similar clothing in a photo on her husband’s Instagram account. It said Hueper’s husband had also posted photos of them near the Capitol. “BEST OF 2020,” he wrote in one, showing her from behind nearing the building. “Marilyn approaching the Capital. As Patriots, there is a righteous revolution to take back our country … To be there was a once-in-a-lifetime experience. STOP THE STEAL!”Hueper said an agent came back with a different and larger photo of the woman, which showed the suspected thief wearing a black sweater with large white snowflakes on it. The agent asked where in the house they could locate the sweater.Hueper said she reiterated she wasn’t inside the building. “No. 2, why didn’t you show me this photo to start with? Because we can both obviously see here this is a different person.”Plus, she said, the sweater was hideous.Hueper said she grabbed the photo and held it next to her face, asking the female agent to look at both closely, “Me. Her. Me. Her,” she told the agent. Hueper said the agent grabbed the paper and walked off.Both women were wearing black Columbia down coats. However, in a photo posted on her husband’s Facebook page from Jan. 6, Hueper is shown wearing a black face mask, a green blouse open at the collar and a light green scarf. The surveillance video released by the FBI shows the sought-after woman wearing the black sweater with a snowflake print and dangling earrings. Also, the woman in the photo has detached earlobes, while Hueper says hers are attached.After insisting, Hueper was shown the front page of the warrant but not allowed to thoroughly read the document, she said. She read it only after receiving a copy as the dozen or so agents and Capitol Police officer left.According to the search warrants, agents could collect any electronics that might be suspected to have been involved, items stolen from the Capitol, a laptop with descriptors and a serial number — “which they didn’t find,” she said — and any paperwork related to planning violence.Hueper said she has not heard back from federal authorities, nor have agents returned her laptop, two iPads, two cellphones or the 50-cent pocket-sized Declaration of Independence booklet they confiscated April 28.She has not been arrested. Justice Department officials would say only that the investigation is ongoing.But she decided to go public with her story, just in case.“I better go online and protect myself before they call me in and make me this person,” she said.___Balsamo reported from Washington.







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Did agents raid home of wrong woman over Jan. 6 riot? Maybe. From “Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines”



ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — A U.S. Capitol Police officer traveled thousands of miles to Homer, Alaska, for an FBI raid on a woman’s home, looking for something stolen during the Jan. 6 insurrection and the person who took it.“We’re looking for Nancy Pelosi’s laptop,” the agents told Marilyn Hueper after briefly handcuffing her. Hueper shot back: “That still doesn’t explain why you’re in my home. Or in Homer, Alaska.”They would walk out with iPads, cellphones and a pocket-sized copy of the Declaration of Independence. They took a laptop, but it wasn’t from the House speaker’s office. And it’s possible they may have the wrong person — even though Hueper looks strikingly similar to the thief.The Justice Department’s massive prosecution of those who stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 has not been without its problems, including this potential instance of mistaken identity. And as Republicans are increasingly seeking to minimize the insurrection and play down the horror of the day, any missteps by federal prosecutors could be used in that effort to discredit what actually happened.Federal prosecutors have charged more than 400 people, the largest undertaking by the department, including scores of defendants who posted images of their crimes online and boasted about breaking into the hallowed building. Some are facing serious charges and considerable prison time.Hueper and her husband first came to officials’ attention this year when Alaska Airlines in February banned the couple for refusing to wear masks on a flight, according to court documents obtained by The Associated Press. Then two other people called in tips saying they recognized Hueper in photos that authorities had released of suspects wanted for storming the Capitol.The insurrectionists sought to disrupt the certification of President Joe Biden’s victory. Hundreds of officers were injured and five people died after the riot, including a Capitol Police officer.Story continuesSupporters of then-President Donald Trump ransacked offices, rifled through lawmakers’ papers and desks, smashed through glass, shattered windows and tore down signs. Among the items stolen: the laptop from Pelosi’s office, her lectern, an iPad belonging to Majority Whip Rep. Jim Clyburn and other electronics.But the volume of people inside the Capitol building, along with the lack of arrests made at the time of the riot, has made it difficult to identify people, even with the glut of social media evidence. Federal agents have dug through thousands of social media posts, gotten sweeping warrants to obtain information on cellphones in the area of the Capitol, used facial recognition tools and obtained logs of devices that signed into the congressional Wi-Fi during the riot.But by far the most effective tool for federal agents has been old-fashioned tips. Many of the rioters have been ratted out by their friends and family members.The warrant, obtained by the AP, identifies Hueper as the woman who took the laptop.But they’re wrong, Hueper insists. She told the AP that another woman wearing her same coat and with a similar hairstyle was inside the Capitol during the insurrection, not her. She admits she was in Washington, D.C., for Trump’s rally that day but says she didn’t get any closer than 100 yards (91 meters) from the Capitol and spent part of the day being lost in an unfamiliar city.She said agents showed her one photo of the woman inside the Capitol, and they looked so similar that Hueper wondered if someone had used photo-editing software to put her in the photograph.The warrant details how FBI agents located an image showing Hueper wearing similar clothing in a photo on her husband’s Instagram account. It said Hueper’s husband had also posted photos of them near the Capitol. “BEST OF 2020,” he wrote in one, showing her from behind nearing the building. “Marilyn approaching the Capital. As Patriots, there is a righteous revolution to take back our country … To be there was a once-in-a-lifetime experience. STOP THE STEAL!”Hueper said an agent came back with a different and larger photo of the woman, which showed the suspected thief wearing a black sweater with large white snowflakes on it. The agent asked where in the house they could locate the sweater.Hueper said she reiterated she wasn’t inside the building. “No. 2, why didn’t you show me this photo to start with? Because we can both obviously see here this is a different person.”Plus, she said, the sweater was hideous.Hueper said she grabbed the photo and held it next to her face, asking the female agent to look at both closely, “Me. Her. Me. Her,” she told the agent. Hueper said the agent grabbed the paper and walked off.Both women were wearing black Columbia down coats. However, in a photo posted on her husband’s Facebook page from Jan. 6, Hueper is shown wearing a black face mask, a green blouse open at the collar and a light green scarf. The surveillance video released by the FBI shows the sought-after woman wearing the black sweater with a snowflake print and dangling earrings. Also, the woman in the photo has detached earlobes, while Hueper says hers are attached.After insisting, Hueper was shown the front page of the warrant but not allowed to thoroughly read the document, she said. She read it only after receiving a copy as the dozen or so agents and Capitol Police officer left.According to the search warrants, agents could collect any electronics that might be suspected to have been involved, items stolen from the Capitol, a laptop with descriptors and a serial number — “which they didn’t find,” she said — and any paperwork related to planning violence.Hueper said she has not heard back from federal authorities, nor have agents returned her laptop, two iPads, two cellphones or the 50-cent pocket-sized Declaration of Independence booklet they confiscated April 28.She has not been arrested. Justice Department officials would say only that the investigation is ongoing.But she decided to go public with her story, just in case.“I better go online and protect myself before they call me in and make me this person,” she said.___Balsamo reported from Washington.







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Mali woman gives birth to nine babies From “World News Headlines, Latest International News, World Breaking News – Times of India”



People wait in front of the Ain Borja private clinic in Casablanca, Morocco where a Malian woman gave birth to nine babies after only expecting seven (AP)BAMAKO: A Malian woman gave birth to nine babies on Tuesday – two more than doctors had detected inside her crowded womb – joining a small pantheon of mothers of nonuplets. The pregnancy of Halima Cisse, 25, has fascinated the West African nation and attracted the attention of its leaders. When doctors in March said Cisse needed specialist care, authorities flew her to Morocco, where she gave birth. “The newborns (five girls and four boys) and the mother are all doing well,” Mali’s health minister, Fanta Siby, said in a statement. Cisse was expected to give birth to seven babies, according to ultrasounds conducted in Morocco and Mali that missed two of the siblings. All were delivered by caesarean section. Nonuplets are extremely rare. Medical complications in multiple births of this kind often mean that some of the babies do not reach full term. FacebookTwitterLinkedinEMail







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Malian woman gives birth to nine babies From “BBC News – World”



Nonuplets are extremely rare – and doctors had thought Halima Cisse was carrying seven babies.







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