Categories
Genel

ICYMI: DJ set in the clouds and Harry Potter in NYC From “BBC News – World”



Here’s some news from this week that you might have missed.







Read All

Categories
Genel

Second year of Covid-19 pandemic set to ‘be far more deadly’ – WHO chief — RT World News From “RT World News”



The head of the World Health Organization (WHO) has warned that the second year of the ongoing pandemic is set to be deadlier than the first, while urging countries to help boost the COVAX vaccine scheme against Covid-19.

Speaking at a media briefing on Friday, Dr. Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus laid out the WHO’s concerns about the slow rollout of the vaccination scheme, as rich countries snap up doses to inoculate their own population, instead of ensuring that at-risk groups in lower income countries are protected.“We’re on track for the second year of this pandemic to be far more deadly than the first,” Tedros stated, before going on to urge states to reconsider vaccinating younger members of their population and “instead donate vaccines to COVAX.”The WHO has been critical of governments focused on achieving a 100% domestic inoculation, rather than working toward the global effort to tackle the virus. Accepting that he understands why nations might want to take a domestic-first approach, he urged governments to address the low vaccine supply in low and lower-middle income countries where they haven’t had enough doses to even fully immunize healthcare workers.

Also on rt.com
Hacker attack shuts down IT system of Ireland’s health services, badly affecting one of Europe’s busiest maternity hospitals

The COVAX scheme is an international project, launched by the WHO, the European Commission and France, to help ensure rapid, fair and equitable access of Covid vaccines to people in all countries, particularly those in less fortunate nations. Since its creation, the program has sent 59 million doses of Covid vaccines to 122 participating countries.The latest remarks from the WHO chief come amid concern that new variants of the Covid-19 virus, specifically the Indian strain, could cause a global spike in case numbers, as it appears more transmissible than the original disease. While there is no reported evidence to show it evades Covid vaccines currently in use, health officials have expressed concern that it could spread quickly in countries that have had slow inoculation drives or a lower uptake of jabs.Like this story? Share it with a friend!







Read All

Categories
Genel

‘A game-changing moment’: Chile constitution could set new gender equality standard | Chile From “World news | The Guardian”



Women’s rights activists in Chile say that the country’s new constitution will catalyze progress for women in the country – and could set a new global standard for gender equality in politics.In a two-day vote this weekend, Chileans will elect a 155-strong citizens’ assembly to write a new constitution for the country – the first anywhere in the world to be written by an equal number of men and women.“It’s a game-changing moment, like when women won the right to vote,” said Antonia Orellana, 31, who is running as a candidate in the capital, Santiago.A new constitution for Chile emerged during an anti-government uprising in October 2019, when calls for equality and fair access to health, pensions and education broadened to a demand for an overhaul of the entire political framework.The current constitution – drawn up in 1980 during the Pinochet dictatorship and chiefly authored by a conservative Catholic lawyer, Jaime Guzmán – prioritizes a market-driven economy but has been broadly criticized for failing to adequately guarantee healthcare, education and pensions.During the uprising, women were among the most fervent advocates of a constitutional rewrite to enshrine equal rights and greater public participation.Although Chile’s current constitution guarantees equality or non-discrimination based on sex, it does not ensure women’s rights to equality in marriage and stipulates the protection of “life to be born” – a clause that has blighted access to legal, safe abortion in the country.Orellana, a journalist and founding member of feminist political party Social Convergence, says her commitment to women’s rights was bolstered after experiencing a clandestine abortion over 10 years ago.Rushed bleeding to the hospital, she miscarried before a doctor threatened to report her to the police.At the time Chile had the strictest abortion laws in the world, prohibited in all circumstances. Eleven years on, progress has been slow, with abortion access only permitted in limited cases.Orellana is campaigning for a constitution that will include diverse reproductive and sexual rights – “not only health rights considered under the male perspective,” she said.Aleta Sprague, a legal analyst at the World Policy Analysis Center, said the assembly has “a lot of potential” for gender equality: the new constitution will be the first drafted in the wake of the global #MeToo movements and a wave of feminist activism across Latin America, which has led to protests against femicide and in favour of legal abortion across the region.“At this moment, there’s a growing recognition of the full range of rights (necessary) to securing gender equality,” she said, citing women’s bodily autonomy and freedom from violence as examples.Chileans voted by a 79% landslide majority in favor of a popularly elected citizen assembly with gender parity – as opposed to a mixed assembly of politicians and citizens without a regulated gender quota – during a referendum in October 2020.For Orellana, the scale of support for parity demonstrates that gender equality is much more than a niche demand.“Feminism in Chile is not just restricted to a single organization, but part of a wider public conversation,” she said. “It is flexible and is seen on many levels.”US-based attorney and co-author of 2018 report A Women’s Guide to Constitution Making, Nanako Tamaru said Chile’s constitutional process is significantly distancing itself from traditional constitutional-making scenarios, when “the leading parties write a constitution that preserves the most power for themselves”.“(Parity) is a big deal,” she said, citing examples of women’s participation in the recent drafting of Tunisia and Zimbabwe constitutions, in 2014 and 2013 respectively. “When we’ve seen more women and more diverse representation it addresses the broader issues around human rights, around justice.”In Chile, feminist constitutional candidates stress that parity in the new constitution does not only benefit women, but any minority group that has been excluded from political spaces, including the country’s indigenous communities, LGBT groups and gender non-conforming people.“It’s about parity of power rather than a binary interpretation of men or women,” said Amaya Alvez, 50, a law professor running as a candidate in Concepción.Orellana acknowledged that not all women in the assembly will share feminist values, but she remains hopeful for change. She said: “It’s time to anchor feminism and use it to open up democracy.”







Read All

Categories
Genel

UK set to rediscover freedom after vaccination success From “Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines”



LONDON (AP) — When London’s Science Museum reopens next week, it will have some new artifacts: empty vaccine vials, testing kits and other items collected during the pandemic, to be featured in a new COVID-19 exhibition.Britain isn’t quite ready to consign the coronavirus to a museum — the outbreak is far from over here. But there is a definite feeling that the U.K. has turned a corner, and the mood in the country is jubilant. “The end is in sight,” one newspaper front page claimed recently. “Free at last!” read another.Thanks to an efficient vaccine rollout program, Britain is finally saying goodbye to months of tough lockdown restrictions.Starting Monday, all restaurants and bars in England can fully reopen, as can hotels, theaters and museums. And Britons will be able to hug friends and family again in public, with the easing of social distancing rules that have been in place since the pandemic began.It’s the biggest step yet to reopen the country following an easing of the crisis blamed for nearly 128,000 deaths, the highest reported COVID-19 toll in Europe.Deaths in Britain have come down to single digits in recent days. It’s a far cry from January, when up to 1,477 deaths a day were recorded amid a brutal second wave driven by a more infectious variant first found in Kent, in southeastern England.New cases have plummeted to an average of around 2,000 a day, compared with nearly 70,000 a day during the winter.Since then, British health officials have raced to get ahead of the virus by vaccinating hundreds of thousands of people a day at hospitals, soccer pitches, churches and a racecourse. As of this week, about 35.7 million people — or approximately 68% of the adult population — have received their first dose. Over 18 million have had both doses.It’s an impressive feat, and many credit Britain’s universal public health system for much of the success.Experts say the National Health Service, one of the country’s most revered institutions, is able to target the whole population and easily identify those most at risk because almost everyone is registered with a local, state-employed general practitioner.Story continuesThat infrastructure, combined with the government’s early start in securing vaccine doses, was key. British authorities began ordering millions of doses from multiple manufacturers late last spring, striking deals months ahead of the European Union and securing more than enough vaccine to inoculate the entire population.“I don’t think it’s surprising that the two countries in the world with probably the strongest primary care systems, which are us and Israel, are doing the best with vaccine rollout,” said Beccy Baird, a policy researcher at the King’s Fund, a charity for improving health care.“We have the medical records. We can understand where our patients are. We’re not trying to negotiate with loads of different insurance companies. … It’s the same standard right through the country,” she added. “Whereas in the States, it’s going to be harder to really think about how do you reach underserved communities, how do you get out there and provide the same access to everybody to this vaccine?”David Salisbury, a former director of the government’s immunization program and a fellow at London’s Chatham House think tank, added that Britain also has the edge because of its track record in successfully rolling out other vaccines, such as the seasonal flu shot.Many around the world were skeptical about Britain’s decision to delay the second dose by up to 12 weeks to free up vaccine for more people, but that strategy also paid huge dividends. The two shots of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines were intended to be given three and four weeks apart.Anthony Harnden, an Oxford academic and a top government vaccination adviser, said “there were lots of questions asked” and “we were up against many countries” who disagreed with spacing out the two doses, but officials stuck to the plan.“You have to remember, looking back at that time, there were a thousand or more people dying every day in the U.K. So there was a huge imperative to get our vulnerable people vaccinated,” he said. “It was an innovative strategy, a bold strategy, but it was based on our experience of previous vaccines.”The vaccine program’s success has been a much-needed boost for Britain.Many of those who accuse the government of poorly managing the outbreak last year say the U.K. is finally doing something right.“We didn’t hand (the vaccine rollout) over to an outsourcing company. That would have been a major failure. And we also didn’t delay the way we did in the first wave. We moved quickly,” said Martin McKee, a professor of European public health at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. “So it was almost like the mirror image of the mistakes we made in the first wave.”Still, McKee said he is worried that too many people may throw caution to the wind too soon.Young people, who run a much lower risk of serious illness but can still spread the virus, are not included in the vaccination program. Official figures also show significant gaps in vaccine uptake among minorities and poor people.McKee and many others are also concerned about the variants of the virus that are turning up. That risk is especially worrying as the U.K. slowly reopens to foreign tourists this summer.“We’ve seen very discouraging evidence from Chile and from the Seychelles, both of which have high proportions of people who have been vaccinated and where many restrictions were lifted, and they’ve had upsurges,” McKee said.Harnden is more optimistic. If the U.K. can roll out a booster vaccine program later this year and if people remain cautious, he said, “we can get ourselves out of this” and get close to normal by the summer of 2022.“We’re not completely out of this yet,” he said, “but we’re in a much, much better place than in the last few months.”___Associated Press producer Mike Fuller in London contributed.







Read All

Categories
Genel

Amazon set to hire 75,000 workers in US and Canada From “BBC News – World”



The online retail giant is hiring extra staff to meet growing demand as the pandemic continues.







Read All

Categories
Genel

Afghan government launches operation to retake district outside Kabul from Taliban hours before Eid ceasefire set to kick in — RT World News From “RT World News”



The Taliban has captured a district located less than an hour drive from Kabul. Government counter-offensive to retake it was launched just hours before three-day Eid al-Fitr ceasefire is expected to begin.

The Nerkh district fell into hands of the Taliban overnight, with a military base and police headquarters overrun by the militants. While, technically, the district lies in the province of Wardak, neighboring Kabul, it’s only some 40km (25 miles) away from the country’s capital.Afghanistan’s authorities have acknowledged the fall of the district, describing its capture by the Taliban as a “tactical retreat” of the government forces.“Security and defense forces made a tactical retreat from the police headquarters of Nerkh district,” Interior Ministry spokesman Tareq Arian told AFP.
Read more

On Wednesday, Afghani special forces were deployed to the district and an operation to retake it has begun. The government has only a few hours left to re-capture the area, as a three-day ceasefire is set to begin on Thursday midnight. The ceasefire was announced by the Taliban over the weekend to mark the end of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan and the Eir al-Fitr festivities.“We will have to do it today because after the ceasefire, it will give the Taliban enough time to dig in and will complicate the operations and increase our casualties,” a senior government official told Reuters on condition of anonymity.Afghanistan has seen an uptick in violence over the past few weeks following the announcement by the US President Joe Biden, who promised to withdraw the American troops from the country by September 11 following two decades of never-ending war. Taliban has criticized the deadline, urging Washington to stick to May 1 deadline, agreed under Donald Trump instead.The ongoing turmoil includes both the intensified fighting between the Taliban and the government, as well as assorted terrorist attacks, happening in Afghanistan on almost daily basis. One of the deadliest incidents of the past weeks occurred back on Saturday, when a school in Kabul was targeted by multiple explosions. The attack killed at least 68 and injured over 160, with the majority of the victims being female students.

Also on rt.com
Kabul school attack: Death toll climbs to 68, over 165 hospitalized with many in critical condition

Kabul was quick to blame the Taliban for the blasts, yet the militant group denied any involvement, condemning the school attack and pointing fingers at Islamic State terrorist group.Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!







Read All

Categories
Genel

Albanian tries to set himself on fire at Eid al-Fitr prayers From “World”



Albanian police say a man tried to set himself on fire during Muslim prayers for Eid-al-Fitr in the capital Tirana







Read All

Categories
Genel

US rapper J Cole set to play in Basketball Africa League From “BBC News – World”



Rumours of the signing first began when Cole was spotted in Kigali over the weekendAmerican rapper J Cole is set to play professional basketball for Rwandan side Patriots BBC.The team will play Nigeria’s Rivers Hoopers on Sunday, opening the first ever Basketball Africa League (BAL).Rumours of the signing began when the musician, whose full name is Jermaine Lamarr Cole, was seen in the Rwandan capital, Kigali, at the weekend.The team’s coach, Alan Major, then confirmed the news to state broadcaster Rwanda TV on Monday.According to sports news site The Undefeated, Cole arrived in Kigali on Saturday and is currently in quarantine ahead of Sunday’s game.Rwandan paper The New Times also tweeted a video of Cole wearing a Patriots jersey, adding that he “could feature” in the NBA-backed league.The 36-year-old Grammy Award winner is expected to play three to six games this season, CBS reports.Cole has reportedly said he wants to play for the NBA in the pastJ Cole is known to be a huge basketball fan and has referenced Lebron James and Michael Jordan in his music, but he has no professional basketball experienceIn 2012 he appeared in the NBA’s Celebrity All Star game which is held during the league’s annual All Star Weekend.At the 2019 All Stars game he performed during the half-time show.’I believe in him’J Cole has previously expressed interest in professional basketball, according to some reports. Fellow rapper and basketball player Master P told TMZ last August that Cole was hoping to make it into the NBA.”I believe in him and I believe that he’s a youngster that has a lot of desire,” Master P said at the time.The NBA-backed BAL tips off this weekend and the signing of J Cole, although unorthodox, has shone the spotlight on this fledgling basketball league.If he does make his debut on Sunday, J Cole could come up against former NBA player Ben Uzoh who signed for Rivers Hoppers last month.The 33-year-old had stints with the then New Jersey Nets, the Cleveland Cavaliers, and the Toronto Raptors as well as playing in Europe. He was part of Nigeria’s 2015 Afrobasket winning squad in Tunisia and member of D’Tigers team which competed at the 2016 Olympic Games in Rio de Janeiro and the 2019 Men’s Basketball World Cup in China.Twelve countries from across the continent will have teams in the BAL: Tunisia, Egypt, Angola, Morocco, Senegal, Nigeria, Algeria, Cameroon, Mali, Mozambique, Madagascar and Rwanda.







Read All

Categories
Genel

UK’s Boris Johnson vows to set up Covid inquiry in this Parliament session From “World News Headlines, Latest International News, World Breaking News – Times of India”



LONDON: British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said on Tuesday his government would set up an inquiry into the Covid-19 pandemic during this parliamentary session. Asked whether he would set up such an inquiry during this Parliament, Johnson said, “I can certainly say that we will do that within this session. I have made that clear before, I do believe it is essential that we have a full proper public inquiry into the Covid pandemic.” A parliamentary session usually runs for a year.







Read All

Categories
Genel

The U.K. is set pursue a ban on ‘conversion therapy.’ Here’s where other countries stand on the issue. From “World”



Tuesday’s announcement positions the U.K. closer to joining only a handful of other countries with nationwide bans against conversion therapy. Here’s a look at where the practice stands globally.







Read All