Categories
Genel

Chickens released as bait in hunt for escaped leopard in China | China From “World news | The Guardian”



Residents in a Chinese city were warned to stay indoors as authorities released flocks of chickens as bait to track down a leopard that escaped from a safari park, state media have reported.The leafy lakeside city of Hangzhou has been on edge since late last week, when residents began spotting leopards roaming around local hills covered in forest and tea plantations.The leopard is one of three that escaped on 19 April – the other two have since been recaptured – a lapse that police said was concealed by the Hangzhou Safari Park’s management for nearly three weeks to avoid affecting its visitor numbers during a long holiday last week.The incident has unleashed a torrent of Chinese internet posts criticising the park for endangering the public, and lamenting the abysmal safety and animal-welfare record of the country’s chaotic zoos and wildlife parks.A rescuer with his dog, part of the search party looking for the escaped leopard in Hangzhou. Photograph: AFP/Getty ImagesPublic outrage has also been fanned by footage of one of the big cats being mauled in a forest by a pack of fierce hunting dogs, and another showing one of the recaptured leopards with part of its hind foot missing.The first leopard was quietly recaptured by the park on 21 April, and the second last Friday by a far larger government search organised as news of the escapes went viral.But the remaining feline has so far eluded the thousands of search personnel using tracker dogs, powered parachutes, and armed with drones and night-vision and heat-detection equipment.Nearly 100 chickens were released to lure the cat, the Modern Express Post in the nearby city of Nanjing reported on Tuesday.Like the other two escapees, it was captive-born, is not used to hunting and is believed to be near starvation.Authorities also have posted additional security near the search zone and residents have been put on alert.A resident passes a sign warning residents about the dangers of a suspected runaway leopard in Hangzhou. Photograph: AP“Leopard tracks have been discovered near mountain villages. Police are searching. Everyone please securely close doors and windows and do not go out,” said a mass text message issued in a neighbourhood adjacent to the park.The park is about 12 miles from downtown Hangzhou.Police said on Monday that careless park personnel allowed the animals to escape while cleaning their enclosure and that the attraction’s general manager, Zhang Dequan, ordered a cover-up while the park scrambled to recover the animals itself.The park came clean only after police launched an investigation into the mounting leopard sightings.Local officials have said five people, including Zhang, have been detained. The park is temporarily closed.Chinese zoos and wildlife parks frequently face criticism over recurring revelations of horrific conditions or deadly incidents blamed on lax management.Chinese state media reported in 2017 that a tiger killed a visitor at a wildlife park in the eastern city of Ningbo after the man apparently entered its enclosure. Tigers at a Beijing park also killed a woman and injured another the previous year after the pair left their vehicle.







Read All

Categories
Genel

Stuart MacGill: Ex-Australian cricketer kidnapped and released in Sydney From “BBC News – World”



Former test bowler Stuart MacGill was abducted and released in a kidnapping last month.







Read All

Categories
Genel

Mexico worries about scorn if another drug lord is released From “World”




Mexican President Andrés Manuel López Obrador is worried that yet another shadowy release of a drug lord is about to make Mexico a target of international ridicule







Read All

Categories
Genel

Genetically-modified mosquito larvae to be released in Florida Keys | Florida From “World news | The Guardian”



The Florida Keys will this week see the release of genetically-modified, non-biting male mosquito larvae as part of a controversial program designed to curb the spread of insect-borne diseases such as dengue, Zika, yellow fever and other human diseases.The Florida Keys Mosquito Control District and British firm biotech Oxitec announced last week that 12,000 of the invasive Aedes aegypti mosquito species are expected to emerge each week for three weeks from six locations: two on Cudjoe Key, one on Ramrod Key and three on Vaca Key.Eventually it is planned that hundreds of millions of the mosquitos might be released.Oxitec’s non-biting male mosquitoes will mate with the local biting female mosquitoes and since the female offspring cannot themselves survive to reproduce, the population of Aedes aegypti is subsequently controlled.According to the CDC, the genetically-modified mosquitos carry two types of genes: a fluorescent marker gene that glows under a special red light, and a self-limiting gene that prevents female mosquito offspring from surviving to adulthood.Mosquitos at the target locations will then be monitored against untreated comparison sites as part of an Environmental Protection Agency-approved project. Oxitec says an evaluation of the project will be provided by the CDC and the University of Florida’s Medical Entomology Laboratory, among others.According to Oxitec, Aedes aegypti makes up about 4%of the mosquito population in the Keys but is responsible for “virtually all mosquito-borne diseases transmitted to humans” and can transmit heartworm and other potentially deadly diseases to pets and animals.“As we are seeing development of resistance to some of our current control methods, we are in need of new tools to combat this mosquito,” said Andrea Leal, executive director of the Florida Keys Mosquito Control District. “And given the unique ecosystem we live in, those tools need to be safe, environmentally friendly, and targeted.”More than 7,300 dengue cases were reported in the US between 2010 and 2020 – cases are largely contracted outside the US, though 71 cases were transmitted in Florida, according to CDC. Over the summer of 2016, the Zika virus infected 29 people within a six-block area forcing them to aerial spray to control mosquitoes, the agency has said.The EPA approved an experimental use permit after a risk assessment in 2019 “determined that there will be no unreasonable adverse effects to humans or the environment as a result of the experimental permit to release Oxitec’s OX5034 male mosquito”.The company claims a trial of the technology in Brazil were successful and did not “persist in the environment or cause harm to beneficial insects”, according to its website.But a similar test in the Cayman Islands in 2016 was delayed by opponents who “argued that the government had not provided sufficient information about potential risks or adequately studied other alternatives”, reported the Associated Press.Some environmentalists remain skeptical or outright opposed. Last year, Jaydee Hanson, policy director for the International Center for Technology Assessment and Center for Food Safety, told the Guardian the program is a “Jurassic Park experiment”.Barry Wray, executive director of the Florida Keys Environmental Coalition added: “People here in Florida do not consent to the genetically engineered mosquitoes or to being human experiments.”A recent report by the non-profit digital science magazine Undark noted that Oxitec had been pushing for an experimental release in the Keys but both Key Haven and Key West had rejected the proposals after critics demanded more proof that the release is necessary.Undark drew attention to the use of tetracycline – an antibiotic without which the female mosquitoes will die in early larval stages.The EPA assessment noted that release of modified mosquitos will not take place within “500 meters of commercial citrus growing areas or wastewater treatment sites due to considerations regarding the impact of environmental sources of tetracyclines on female OX5034 mosquito survival”.A Yale University study that analyzed Oxitec’s Brazil release had claimed some of the offspring of the genetically modified mosquitoes had survived to adulthood, though Oxitec rejected the findings, telling Gizmodo in 2019 that the study includes “numerous false, speculative and unsubstantiated claims and statements”.







Read All