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NSW Labor warns members their data could end up online after hacker’s deadline passes | Labor party From “World news | The Guardian”



New South Wales Labor has warned its members their data could be posted online as early as Saturday after the organisation was targeted by a ransomware attack and the hacker group’s deadline passed.On 5 May, NSW Labor’s systems were taken offline after the party fell victim to a ransomware attack by a hacker group known as Avaddon.The ransomware attack works by sending phishing emails with attachments that look like images but contain malware that steals and encrypts sensitive data. The hacker group then threatens to not only block the organisation accessing it, but to publish the sensitive data. The group also threatens the organisation with distributed denial of service attacks that would keep their systems offline.The information on NSW Labor members obtained by the group allegedly includes contracts, licences, passports and employee information.The hacker group gave NSW Labor 10 days to pay, and the party informed members last night as the deadline drew close that their data may end up online.“We have been working hard to investigate the incident and to protect our systems and prevent the personal data of members from being compromised. This incident has been our absolute priority,” the party told members in an email on Friday evening.”Despite our concerted efforts, there is a possibility that data held by NSW Labor has been compromised and may be leaked on Saturday morning. If this leak takes place, we will issue another member broadcast immediately.”The NSW police cyber crime squad and IT forensic experts have been brought in to investigate. A police spokesperson said detectives were still making inquiries.The party advised members that if data was leaked online they should change their banking passwords and email passwords, and may potentially need to update their passports, tax file numbers and other sensitive information.NSW Labor declined to comment further.The Australian Cyber Security Centre last week issued a high alert about the Avaddon ransomware group, stating multiple organisations across a wide variety of sectors had been targeted by the group in recent weeks.The law enforcement, government, pharmaceutical, academia, marketing, IT, construction and energy sectors had all been targeted in countries including Australia, Canada, the US, the UK, India and China.







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Australia live news: NSW government in minority after MP moves to crossbench; Labor bets big on housing | Australia news From “World news | The Guardian”



From our hard-working friends at AAP:
Defence minister Peter Dutton insists the quarantine system will be able to cope when the travel ban lifts and flights from India resume.
The first plane load of Australians from India will land on Saturday morning after flights were suspended for several weeks to allow the Howard Springs quarantine facility in Darwin to deal with positive Covid-19 cases before more potentially infectious people arrived.
Dutton said the commonwealth had been working closely with the Northern Territory government since the India travel ban was imposed.
“We will continue to work particularly with vulnerable groups to help them back into our country as quickly as possible,” he told Nine on Friday.
“We have put in other measures around pre-flight testing and making sure if we’re bringing people out of a zone like India at the moment we can do it safely so we don’t undo what is a magnificent story here in Australia.”

Indira Gandhi airport in the Indian capital of New Delhi. Photograph: Sajjad Hussain/AFP/Getty Images

Complicating that story is mixed messages about the timetable for the vaccine rollout.
Dutton insists everyone willing to be vaccinated will receive two shots by the end of this year.
“Now some people will make a decision that they don’t want the vaccine, and the government is not going to force them to have the vaccine, so let’s be realistic in terms of some parts of society,” he said.
This end of year deadline puts Dutton directly at odds with the prime minister, who has spent the week walking back an end date for the rollout’s completion.
The treasurer and health minister have also clashed on the rollout timeline.
Deputy opposition leader Richard Marles leapt on the mixed messaging.
“You’ve got complete confusion, even with Peter today, as to whether or not there’s going to be two jabs by the end of the year,” Marles said.
“They can’t give you a straight answer in relation to that question and we all know properly vaccinating the country is how we actually more forward and past this in an economic sense.”
The government has ordered 25m doses of Moderna vaccines, giving its rollout a shot in the arm.
Marles said the vaccine deal should have been secured last year.
“The reason why we are now back on the queue is because the work they’re doing now they didn’t do last year when it mattered,” he said.
“This time last year we knew vaccines were in the pipeline. It was then the government should have been actually spreading the country’s risk.
“Instead they bet the house on the idea AstraZeneca being manufactured in Australia would be able to do the whole job.”

Vials with Pfizer-BioNTech and Moderna Covid-19 vaccines. Photograph: Dado Ruvić/Reuters

The first 10m doses of Moderna are due to arrive this year while the rest – booster jabs for different variants – are slated to be delivered next year.
The Moderna jab has not yet been approved by the Therapeutic Goods Administration but the company is expected to apply for that soon.
People under 50 are set to receive the Moderna vaccine.
CSL is already making the AstraZeneca vaccine in Melbourne; the Pfizer vaccine is fully imported.
A clear flow of supply will be needed as GPs begin the rollout to all Australians aged over 50 next week.







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NSW health minister condemns media for naming Sydney ‘barbecue man’ at centre of Covid outbreak | Health From “World news | The Guardian”



The New South Wales health minister has said a newspaper’s decision to name the man who visited numerous barbecue shops in Sydney while infected with Covid-19 was “appalling” and would undermine public health.Brad Hazzard said the Australian Financial Review’s story identifying a patient “stinks” because it may discourage the public from cooperating fully with the contact tracers in the future and the man had not consented to have his identity revealed.“No journalist should think it’s OK to go naming a patient, someone who is working with [the Department of] Health,” Hazzard said.“It’s the quickest way to destroy the confidence of all of us if we think that some journalist somewhere thinks it’s OK to name a patient who is working with us to make sure the community stays safe. It stinks, actually.”Last week, the state announced two locally acquired cases, a man in his 50s from Woollahra – dubbed Patient X – and his wife, also in her 50s, but the couple was not named as is the usual practice.AFR editor-in-chief Michael Stutchbury has defended his decision to identify the patient as newsworthy. “[The executive] is a prominent businessman involved in a number of key business transactions and it was newsworthy and in the public interest to explain his movements given the ongoing reporting around the visits,” a spokesperson for Stutchbury told Guardian Australia.“We approached [the company] and they were aware of the story and provided comments. We recognise and acknowledge the government’s concerns and did not take this decision lightly.”The NSW chief health officer, Dr Kerry Chant, said the man, who was named against his will, was reassured by the department that the information did not come from officials.“I’m incredibly disappointed,” Chant said. “I stood up [at the press conference] every day and I got to say I really respect the way the media hasn’t pushed me when I won’t give the exact age or disclose something.“In the end we rely on people sharing the most blow-by-blow descriptions.”Chant said the man had taken several calls a day from the department and had provided multiple details including his walking route and his credit card time stamps. “It’s not a good outcome for public health when that happens,” Chant said.Last week the premier, Gladys Berejiklian, said the man had been “very active in the inner east” and had been “very good” at registering his details at locations he visited, including a cinema at Bondi Junction and several barbecue stores.On Monday, in its markets column Street Talk, the Nine Entertainment financial daily revealed the man’s name, position and employer.The AFR story was then copied by the Daily Mail and news.com.au, which both ran multiple photographs which further identified the couple.The newspaper carried a comment from the man’s employer, saying it won’t comment on an employee’s medical condition.







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NSW Covid restrictions extended as authorities yet to find ‘missing link’ in Sydney outbreak | New South Wales From “World news | The Guardian”



New South Wales will extend most of its Covid-19 restrictions for another week as it struggles to identify the missing link between a quarantine case and the recent, small outbreak.The state has again not reported any further community transmission, recording zero cases in the 24 hours to 8pm Saturday.But NSW Health said it was still unable to identify the link between a case in hotel quarantine and two cases in the eastern suburbs, which were connected by rapid genomic sequencing work last week.The state will therefore extend the current restrictions by another week across Greater Sydney, aside from one change, which will allow customers to shop without masks. Retail staff will continue to need to wear masks.On Thursday, the state announced two locally acquired cases, a man in his 50s from Woollahra – dubbed Patient X – and his wife, also in her 50s.The source of their infection has not yet yet been established. But authorities continue to believe he contracted the virus upon brief contact with someone else who was infectious in the community.“Investigations are ongoing into the source of two locally acquired cases, announced on Thursday 6 May,” NSW Health said on Sunday. “They are household contacts of each other; a man and woman in their 50s from the eastern suburbs.”“Despite extensive investigations to date, NSW Health has not identified how the initial case, the man in his 50s, was exposed to Covid-19, which suggests he acquired the infection through brief contact with a currently unidentified person who was infectious in the community.”The extension of the restrictions will last until 12.01 am, Monday 17 May.Households will be limited to 20 visitors, including children, and masks will still be compulsory on public transport and in public indoor venues, including aged care facilities. Visitors to aged care facilities are still limited to two people per day.Pubs and bars will not be allowed to have patrons standing up and drinking and dancing will continue to be prohibited, except for at weddings. Singing by audiences at indoor shows or at church is also not allowed.Promisingly, NSW Health said testing numbers were still strong. About 18,000 tests were reported to 8pm last night, a dip from the 22,153 the day prior.NSW Health said high testing rates were vital for detecting the unknown link that led to the community transmission.“We thank the community for their strong response to calls for testing and continue to urge everyone in NSW with even the mildest symptoms – such as headache, fatigue, cough, sore throat or runny nose – to come forward immediately for testing, then isolate until you receive a negative result.”







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NSW Covid-19 hotspots: list and map of Sydney and regional coronavirus case locations | New South Wales From “World news | The Guardian”



New South Wales health authorities have updated a list of hotspots Covid-positive people have visited while infectious.Here’s an overview and what to do if you’ve visited them. More detailed information is available at the NSW Health website.Latest Covid-19 case locations in NSWNSW coronavirus hotspots mapSee a map of the current NSW Covid-19 hotspot locations from the list above.
Due to the unprecedented and ongoing nature of the coronavirus outbreak, this article is being regularly updated to ensure that it reflects the current situation at the date of publication. Any significant corrections made to this or previous versions of the article will be footnoted in line with Guardian editorial policy.







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Australia news live: NSW contact tracers scramble to contain spread following local Covid case in Sydney’s east | Australia news From “World news | The Guardian”



A very good morning to you all on this dreary autumn’s Thursday (well, at least it’s dreary where I am, so I demand everyone suffer because of that).
Sydney is dealing with a worrying case of mystery Covid community transmission. The NSW premier Gladys Berejiklian says it’s likely there will be more community cases to come after a man in Sydney’s east tested positive yesterday, despite not recently travelling overseas, not working in a hotel quarantine, border or a health role and basically having no idea where he caught the virus.
Essentially the hunt is now on for the missing Covid-19 link.
NSW Health believes this man has been infectious, with a high viral load, since last Friday. He has been moving around the community, visiting up to 20 venues, but luckily, health authorities say he had been meticulous about checking in using QR codes.
A list of venues of concern has been compiled which includes a number of barbecue stores in Silverwater, Annandale and Casula, a meat store in Bondi Junction and a petrol station in Mascot.
He also attended a screening of The Courier at Event Cinemas Bondi Junction on Friday before attending Figo Restaurant at Rushcutters Bay.
This has led Berejiklian to warn:

Everybody in the state needs to be on high alert.
Anybody anywhere with the mildest of symptoms needs to come forward and get tested.

And she really does mean everyone, because, on Wednesday evening, NSW Health reported viral fragments had been detected in the Marrickville sewage network in the city’s west.
The catchment includes about 42,000 people and takes sewage from Dulwich Hill, Marrickville, Summer Hill, Lewisham, Ashfield, Haberfield, Petersham, Lilyfield and Leichhardt.

NSW Health is asking everyone in these areas to be especially vigilant in monitoring for symptoms, and if they appear get tested and isolate immediately until a negative result is received.

Berejiklian said it was too early to say if NSW’s coronavirus-related restrictions need to be tightened. Miraculously, so far no states or territories have slammed closed their borders, although most have ruled that anyone who has visited a Sydney hotspot and since travelled interstate must isolate for 14 days.
Now there is plenty to get through (because despite what Sydney thinks, the world doesn’t actually revolve around Sydney), so why don’t we jump into the day!
If there is something you reckon I’ve missed or think should be in the blog but isn’t, shoot me a message on Twitter @MatildaBoseley or email me at matilda.boseley@theguardian.com.







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Morning mail: more NSW Covid cases likely, vaccine success, Trump ban upheld | From “World news | The Guardian”



Good morning. Contact tracers in NSW are scrambling to contain the spread of Covid-19 in the community, Queensland police face scrutiny over domestic violence inaction, and the Guardian marks its 200th birthday. That, and more aplenty in Thursday’s morning mail.NSW is bracing for more cases of community transmission after a man who tested positive for Covid-19 on Wednesday has health authorities concerned due to his level of activity while potentially infectious. The premier, Gladys Berejiklian, said the man, aged in his 50s, had been “very active in the inner east” areas of Sydney prior to being tested on Tuesday. As contact tracers scramble to identify people who may have been exposed to the virus, Berejiklian praised the man for using venue QR codes, making it easier for them to issue a list of venues of concern.Queensland police repeatedly rebuffed research projects seeking to examine the organisation’s response to domestic violence, despite increasing case numbers and mounting evidence of cultural problems within its ranks. Academics such as the highly regarded criminologist Kerry Carrington received rejection letters that denied permission to survey officer attitudes for several years, but after the recent high-profile deaths of Doreen Langham and Kelly Wilkinson – women killed after repeatedly seeking police help – senior officers now say they want to explore Carrington’s ideas.Moderna’s “tweaked” vaccine has successfully neutralised the worrying coronavirus variants that emerged in South Africa and Brazil in laboratory trials, the US company has said. Meanwhile, Canada has authorised the use of Pfizer’s Covid-19 vaccine for children as young as 12, with the United States tipped to follow suit “very soon”. Elsewhere, India’s neighbours have announced border closures, with the Himalayan nation of Nepal recording record new infections and “really frightening” strains on hospitals, according to local doctors. In Europe, Italy’s prime minister remains confident the nation can reopen to tourists in mid-May, excluding nations with mutant variants such as Brazil and India.Donald Trump’s Facebook account should not be reinstated, the social media giant’s oversight board said on Wednesday, barring an imminent return to the platform. However, the board has punted the final decision over Trump’s account back to Facebook itself, suggesting the platform make a decision in six months regarding what to do with Trump’s account and whether it will be permanently deleted.AustraliaThe University of Sydney main campus. Australia has seen a massive drop in international students since the start of the pandemic. Photograph: Paul Miller/AAPInternational student enrolments at Australian universities have almost halved since the start of the pandemic, with 43,000 fewer international students attending tertiary institutions compared with last year. One vice-chancellor has said the revenue lost would tally hundreds of millions.Linda Reynolds has called for “hard discussions” over the future funding of the national disability insurance scheme, warning that on its current trajectory the NDIS “will not be viable in the medium or long term”.Over half of the jobkeeper bonuses provided to private equity-owned retailer Best&Less has flowed through to profit the company, which is currently being touted to investors. Several leading Australian companies that posted improved revenues while receiving coronavirus subsidies have repaid the funds.Labor leader Anthony Albanese has called for “serious” investment in the aged care sector, accusing the prime minister of “callously” ignoring the needs of “our most vulnerable citizens”, as part of a major pre-budget speech outlining his “cautious” spending credentials.The worldA demonstrator waves a Colombian flag during a protest against poverty and police violence in Bogota. Photograph: Luisa González/ReutersMass protests continue in Colombia after another night of unrest that has seen 24 people killed in the past week. An unpopular tax reform prompted initial nationwide protests, but concerns over poverty and heavy-handed policy have swelled the civil disobedience.New conservative president of the Madrid region, Isabel Díaz Ayuso, has proclaimed her party as a “counterweight” to Spain’s Socialist-led national government, after winning more seats than the three leftwing parties combined in a snap election that has been dubbed one of the most “fraught and vituperative” campaigns of recent years.A prince from Liechtenstein’s royal family has been accused of shooting Romania’s largest bear, and possibly the largest living in the European Union. The prince allegedly paid €7,000 for a licence to “harvest” a kill, despite Romania outlawing trophy hunting in 2016.Archaeologists have uncovered what’s being claimed as the oldest known human burial, after uncovering the remains of a child in Kenya, carefully laid to rest 80,000 years ago.Recommended reads‘We report for Australia, but we are part of something bigger – a global parent company and the big foundational idea of independent journalism, beholden to nothing except the pursuit of the truth.’ Photograph: Carly Earl/The Guardian“Milestone birthdays are times for reflection, for assessing achievements and charting the path ahead.” Guardian Australia might be just eight years old, but as the Guardian celebrates its 200th birthday, editor Lenore Taylor examines the principles that guide the Australian office. “We report for Australia, but we are part of something bigger – a global parent company and the big foundational idea of independent journalism, beholden to nothing except the pursuit of the truth.”In a year in which unemployment soared, and the economy staggered, the number of new mortgages taken out in March was 55% higher than it was in March last year. It flies in the face of conventional common sense, but as Greg Jericho writes, with the government buttressing the housing market and the banks providing record low interest rates, Australian house prices appear set to keep rising. “I’m sick of paying heaps to live in a shoebox and I’m thinking about leaving the city for somewhere cheaper … No one thinks this is a good idea.” That’s the dilemma advice columnist Eleanor Gordon-Smith sets out to tackle this week, as thousands of Australians contemplate “city fatigue” under the ongoing shadow of a global pandemic. “If my ancestors could see me they would hoot angrily on their bone-trumpets and fill my T-shirt with the semi-poison berries.” That’s Jack Vening’s assessment of how our predecessors would regard our present internet fixation. But they’re not here, and we are. So here’s this week’s 10 funniest things on the internet.ListenBubble or boom? With Australian house prices continuing to break records, could large swathes of middle, and younger, Australia face being priced out completely? On this episode of Full Story, Martin Farrer examines the factors fuelling the current price rises.Full StoryIs buying a home in Australia only for the wealthy?Sorry your browser does not support audio – but you can download here and listen https://audio.guim.co.uk/2020/05/05-61553-gnl.fw.200505.jf.ch7DW.mp3Full Story is Guardian Australia’s daily news podcast. Subscribe for free on Apple Podcasts, Spotify or any other podcasting app.SportThere is not much separating Queensland and the Brumbies, though the Reds narrowly won both regular-season games. Photograph: Regi Varghese/Getty ImagesThe Reds have beaten the Brumbies twice already this season, but the key to clinching this weekend’s Super Rugby AU final could be in their own hands, literally, as Bret Harris explains. “Make no mistake, when the Reds’ passes stick, they are capable of scoring exhilarating, long-range tries, but the ball goes to ground too often.”Australian rugby sevens star Ellia Green has called on sport participants to “show more empathy” and avoid homophobic and sexist language, as part of the world’s first community rugby pride game, hosted by Melbourne Rugby Club.Sam Kerr has continued her scoring ways in the Women’s Super League, netting a brace against London rivals Tottenham, to ensure the title race with Manchester City goes right down to the wire.Media roundupThe government faces a logistical nightmare getting citizens home from India, the Sydney Morning Herald reports. At least two repatriation flights will be dispatched to India every week once the controversial travel ban ends on 15 May. Taiwan has warned it’s preparing for a “final assault” by China, the Australian Financial Review claims, with the island’s foreign minister welcoming criticism of China from Australian government and defence officials. And the men involved in the kidnapping of former Test cricketer Stuart MacGill could be connected to a workplace dispute, the Herald Sun claims.Coming upHearings will be held in a class action against the commonwealth over robodebt.An inquiry into the destruction of Indigenous heritage sites at Juukan Gorge will be looking at Indigenous heritage protection in Queensland and the Northern Territory.And if you’ve read this far …Fearful and anxious dogs behave more aggressively towards strangers. Photograph: Tatyana/Getty Images/iStockphotoSmall dog, big bite. According to researchers in Finland the aggression level of dogs towards humans is related to their size, with pint-sized poodles more likely to growl, bark, snap or bite. Could this also translate to humans?Sign upIf you would like to receive the Guardian Australia morning mail to your email inbox every weekday, sign up here.







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NSW Covid case: man tests positive after being ‘very active’ in Sydney while infectious | Sydney From “World news | The Guardian”



A NSW man has tested positive for Covid-19 in a new case of community transmission that has health authorities concerned due to his level of activity while potentially infectious.The premier, Gladys Berejiklian, said the man, aged in his 50s, had been “very active in the inner east” areas of Sydney prior to being tested on Tuesday. She said he had been “very good” at registering his details at locations he visited, including a cinema at Bondi Junction and several barbecue stores.As contact tracers scramble to identify people who may have been exposed to the virus, Berejiklian praised the man for using venue QR codes, making it easier for them to issue a list of venues of concern.Health authorities were also working to identify how the man could have contracted the infection as he had not travelled overseas recently and does not work in a hotel quarantine, border or health role.The state’s chief health officer, Dr Kerry Chant, said the case was concerning because his test result, returned on Wednesday, showed he had a high viral load, making him potentially more infectious.“The next ring of testing around this case will actually tell us whether he’s passed it on,” Chant said.“But also in this case we’re really interested in how this person acquired the infection to understand the broader risk in the community. That’s why we’re asking people that have symptoms compatible with Covid to redouble your efforts and come out and get tested.”On Wednesday night, NSW Health said fragments of the virus that caused Covid had been detected in the Marrickville sewage network, which covers 42,000 people in Dulwich Hill, Marrickville, Summer Hill, Lewisham, Ashfield, Haberfield, Petersham, Lilyfield and Leichhardt.The health department asked people in those suburbs to be “especially vigilant” for symptoms and to get tested and isolate if they appeared.Berejiklian earlier had reminded people to check-in to venues to ensure all contacts were identified. “The strong message is QR codes work,” Berejiklian said.“We need them to keep us safe. This is a good wake-up call. We can never be complacent. We need to be aware that virus is still around. While in a pandemic we still have to maintain that level of caution and I just hope that everybody takes this as a wake-up call to make sure all of us adjust our behaviour. It’s easy to let down your guard especially in a social setting.”It was too early to say whether more stringent health and safety measures needed to be introduced, she said, but added any response would be “proportionate”.“As I travel around the state, it’s interesting, different parts are more complacent than others, but when there is a case and we don’t know the source, we have to be on alert,” she said.“It could have been someone who came in from a different state or city. We don’t know, so therefore all options are on the table. It’s way too early. It also means unfortunately we can’t rule anything out. Everybody in the state needs to be on high alert.”The man was considered to be infectious since Friday 30 April when he saw the film, the Courier, at Westfield Bondi Junction about 6pm. He went to Figo restaurant at Rushcutters Bay about 8.45pm and went to several barbecue stores in Silverwater and Casula on the weekend.Chant said he had returned a low cycle threshold [CT] value, with the value referring to the number of cycles of amplification required for viral RNA to reach a detectable level. The lower the number of cycles needed, the higher the viral load.“So the CT values in this case were low, so just to be clear low CT values mean that you have a higher viral load and therefore potentially are more infectious, so they do give us some cause for concern,” she said.







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Parents of Pakistani man who died in NSW floods forced to watch burial through car window | Australia east coast floods 2021 From “World news | The Guardian”



The parents of a man who died when his car was trapped in New South Wales flood waters have farewelled their son at a prayer service in Sydney after flying in from Pakistan.Ayaz Younus, 25, was travelling to his first day at a new job in Glenorie on 24 March when his car got stuck in flood waters and he was unable to escape. He was on the phone to emergency services for almost 40 minutes before he died.His grieving parents were given permission to enter Australia for the funeral. They arrived in Sydney on Sunday and followed strict protocols.The emotional couple were unable to touch their son’s body or coffin and were kept apart from Younus’s friends due to Covid restrictions.Younus’s father, Muhammad Younus, was unable to address mourners but in a pre-recorded message broadcast at the service said the family was heartbroken.“When I stepped out of Sydney airport, my eyes were looking for him,” the grieving father said.“I wished he would have been there to welcome his parents. I wished we could have hugged him once more. I wished we could have embraced him and kissed his forehead. But alas it didn’t happen. Rather we are here to say goodbye to him.”Muhammad Younus said his son had spoken to his family about bringing them to Australia and showing them his new home.“Australia is a beautiful country and once you come here, Dad, I will show you around. These were the words of my dear son Ayaz whenever he used to call me,” he said.“One day before his death, he was talking to his friend and telling him that now he would be doing double duty as a truck driver and also as an Uber driver, so he may bring his parents, brothers and sister here in Australia.”Mourners at the service for Ayaz Younus at the Baitul Huda mosque, in Marsden Park, on Wednesday. Photograph: Steven Saphore/AAPThe father thanked the prime minister, Scott Morrison, and the immigration minister, Alex Hawke, for helping organise their attendance.“I wished my children could have been here with me also, to say goodbye to their beloved brother. I still hope and pray that one day they will be here to pay their respect and pray, standing at his grave.”Younus had three siblings – two older brothers and a younger sister – who were unable to attend the service and instead watched it on Zoom from Pakistan.Younus’s parents were confined to a car for the actual burial, forced to watch and film from a distance through a partially wound-down window. Muhammad Younus was briefly allowed outside the vehicle to shovel sand on his son’s coffin.The funeral was held at the Ahmadiyya Muslim Association of Australia’s mosque, the Baitul Huda mosque, in Marsden Park.The association helped pay for the family’s travel, accommodation and funeral costs because Younus was an active volunteer with the organisation.Mourners participate in the burial of Ayaz Younus in Sydney. Photograph: Steven Saphore/AAPYounus’s coffin was earlier displayed in a hall for his friends and family to farewell him. When his parents arrived, the hall was emptied.Younus was remembered as an active member of the local community who arrived in Australia two years ago. He had volunteered to help with the flood clean-up before he died.Younus shared a home with two friends – Imran Ahfad and Atta Sharifi.Ahfad said they had enjoyed travelling and seeing Australia. “We travelled a lot, especially in the past year, to different cities,” he said. “We would spend time there with friends.”The housemate said Younus “loved going to the gym and playing volleyball – he was a very energetic person”.Mirza Sharif, the public relations director at the Ahmadiyya Muslim Association of Australia, said it had been difficult to arrange for Younus’s parents to travel to Sydney for the funeral.“They’re in quarantine at the moment and an exemption was given only after an intense negotiation, with the immigration department, for them to be released for only a very short period of time,” he said. “It was a minute-to-minute procedure.”The funeral for Younus was delayed due to a coronial inquiry and because of the complications in obtaining permission for his parents to attend.- with Australian Associated Press







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Australia’s NSW scrambles after locally-acquired COVID case | Coronavirus pandemic News From “Al Jazeera – Breaking News, World News and Video from Al Jazeera”



Man from Sydney’s eastern suburbs is first to acquire the virus locally in more than a month.Australia’s most populous state of New South Wales (NSW) on Wednesday has reported its first locally acquired COVID-19 case in more than a month, sending authorities rushing to trace the source of the virus.
A man in his 50s who tested positive for the new coronavirus had visited a cinema, restaurants, a service station and a butcher in Sydney’s eastern suburbs while not knowing he was infectious, authorities said on Wednesday.
The infected person has not travelled overseas recently and does not work in a high-risk job such as in hotel quarantine or hospitals, NSW state Chief Health Officer Kerry Chant told reporters in Sydney.
“So all of the usual routes where we would expect someone to have acquired the infection are not clear,” Chant said. Close contacts have been asked to undergo tests and self-isolate.
Australia has largely contained the coronavirus outbreak through snap lockdowns, border controls and speedy contact-tracing systems, with just over 29,800 cases and 910 deaths since the pandemic began.
It has reported zero cases on most days this year.







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