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‘It’s genocide’: Protesters slam Israel, support Palestinians | Human Rights News From “Al Jazeera – Breaking News, World News and Video from Al Jazeera”



Protesters have marched across the world in support of Palestinians amid the worst Israeli-Palestinian violence since the 2014 Gaza war.
At least 140 Palestinians, including 39 children, have been killed after Israel launched air attacks on Gaza earlier this week.
On Saturday, Israel targeted a refugee camp in Gaza where at least 10 Palestinians were killed.
Protests took place in major cities around the world, including Doha, London, Paris and Madrid.
Iraq
Hundreds of demonstrators gathered in cities across Iraq to stand in solidarity with Palestinians.
The demonstrators waved Palestinian flags and banners across five provinces in rallies called for by influential cleric Muqtada al-Sadr. Protesters gathered in the Iraqi capital Baghdad and the southern provinces of Babylon, Dhi Qar, Diwanieh and Basra in a show of support.
Iraqi demonstrators wave Palestinian flags during a protest to express solidarity with the Palestinian people amid a flare-up of Israeli-Palestinian violence, in Baghdad [Thaier al-Sudani/Reuters]
Qatar
In Doha, thousands waved flags and displayed messages in solidarity with the Palestinians.
“I am taking a stand against the genocide perpetrated by Israel in our country. We will do whatever it takes to free our country… Since we can’t be there in person, we are here at this protest today… I am very angry, very heartbroken by what is happening,”  Reem Alghoul,  a Palestinian living in Doha, told Al Jazeera.
In Doha, thousands gathered at Imam Muhammad Abdel-Wahhab Mosque waving flags and displaying solidarity with the people in Palestine [Showkat Shafi/Al Jazeera]

France
Hundreds converged in the Barbes neighbourhood in the north of Paris amid a significant security presence of some 4,200 officers.
Paris police used tear gas and water cannon to disperse the rally held despite a ban by authorities, who feared a flare-up of anti-Semitic violence during the worst violence between Israel and Hamas in years.
A handful of garbage bins were set on fire and rocks and other projectiles were hurled towards police, but no arrests were reported.
People hold up Palestinian flags during a protest in support of Palestinians following a flare-up of Israeli-Palestinian violence [Benoit Tessier/Reuters]
Spain
In Madrid, some 2,500 people, many of them young people wrapped in Palestinian flags, marched to the Puerta del Sol plaza in the city centre.
“This is not a war, it’s genocide,” they chanted.
“They are massacring us,” said Amira Sheikh-Ali, a 37-year-old of Palestinian origin.
A man holds a flag during a protest in support of Palestinians amid the ongoing violence, at Puerta del Sol square, in Madrid [Juan Medina/Reuters]
Lebanon
Hundreds of Lebanese and Palestinians have protested along the Lebanon-Israel border, with some climbing a border wall and triggering Israeli fire that wounded one person.
Some protesters threw Molotov cocktails and rocks over the wall during a protest on Saturday in the Lebanese border village of Odayseh, where hundreds marched waving Palestinian and Lebanese flags, as well as the yellow banners of the Hezbollah group.
Lebanese and Palestinians from around Lebanon have been heading to the border to protest against Israeli attacks on Gaza.
Protests at the Lebanon-Israel border [Kareem Chehayeb/Al Jazeera]
Kashmir
In Indian-administered Kashmir, police cracked down on pro-Palestine protesters and detained at least 20 of them.
A number of people carrying Palestinian flags took to the streets in the main city of Srinagar after Friday prayers.
The protesters raised pro-Palestine and anti-Israel slogans.
The police said it “wouldn’t allow cynical encashments of public anger to trigger violence, lawlessness and disorder on Kashmir streets”.
“How can we be silent when they [Israel] are killing children in Gaza. Every human on earth should stand up for them. This is about showing humanity and solidarity, but we are not even able to do that due to fear,” a 25-year-old resident of Srinagar told Al Jazeera.

My friend, the brilliant Kashmir artist Mudasir Gul has been charged under PSA (Public Safety Act) by Indian govt for drawing art work in support of Palestine.#freemudasirgul#freedomofspeech#indiahttps://t.co/mkx9YhkUy7 pic.twitter.com/jlqiSN2R2D
— Mir Suhail (@mirsuhail) May 15, 2021

United Kingdom
In London, several thousand protesters carrying placards reading “Stop bombing Gaza” and chanting “Free Palestine” converged on Marble Arch to march towards the Israeli embassy.
Packed crowds stretched along Kensington High Street where the embassy is located.
Organisers claimed as many as 100,000 people had gathered for the demonstration through London; the police said it was unable to confirm any figure.
Pro-Palestinian demonstrators hold Palestinian flags, as they attend a protest following in London [Henry Nicholls/Reuters]
Germany
Thousands marched in Berlin and other German cities following a call by the Samidoun Palestinian Prisoner Solidarity Network.
Three marches were authorised in Berlin’s Neuköln district, home to large numbers of people with Turkish and Arabic roots.
The protesters shouted “Boycott Israel” and threw stones and bottles at the police, leading to several arrests. Other protests were held in Frankfurt, Leipzig and Hamburg.
People take part in a protest in support of Palestinians, in Berlin on Friday [Axel Schmidt/Reuters]With additional reporting by Rifat Fareed in Srinagar, Showkat Shafi in Doha and Kareem Chehayeb in Odayseh








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UN human rights chief: Crisis in Gaza, Israel "has deteriorated at an alarming rate" From “Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines”



UN human rights chief: Crisis in Gaza, Israel "has deteriorated at an alarming rate"







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The Islamic State used Iraqi prisoners as human test subjects in experiments with chemical and possibly biological weapons, United Nations investigators conclude in a report that sheds new light on the terrorist group’s forays into making a weapon of mass destruction : worldnews From “World News”



No evidence. You just lack self-criticism, and the ability to accept that islam also has extremist groups. Your username indicates you’re from Indonesia, but you’re only contributing to the significant phenomenom of the middle east where self-criticism is so often discouraged or censored, and everything is blamed on 2-3 western nations.







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Israel’s bombing of Gaza apartment buildings could be a war crime, human rights groups warn From “World News”



submitted by /u/Techving [comments]







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Jerusalem: ‘She is 12 years old, yet they have shot her’ | Human Rights From “Al Jazeera – Breaking News, World News and Video from Al Jazeera”



MSF’s Medical Coordinator Dr Natalie Thurtle shares her experiences of treating injured Palestinians in Jerusalem.On May 10, after the Israeli police attacked and injured hundreds of Palestinians, Médecins Sans Frontières (Doctors Without Borders, MSF) started offering clinical support to the Palestine Red Crescent Society (PRCS) in Jerusalem. My MSF colleagues and I worked alongside the PRCS at the organisation’s trauma stabilisation point in Wadi al-Joz to assess and stabilise the wounded.
One of the first patients I saw that day was 12-year-old Aliya*. She cried as we edged her jeans off as gently as possible to examine her. She had a dark bruise as large as a grown man’s fist on her upper thigh. However, it was not a fist that caused her injury – it was a rubber bullet. Aliya was shot as she walked near her home with her mother. I asked her weight in order to calculate the correct dose of pain relief to give her. She told me that she weighs just 28kgs – and yet she was shot. She could not walk, so we worried that she may have a fracture on her femur. We transferred her to hospital for an x-ray.
Meanwhile, my MSF colleague Andy was suturing a 14-year-old boy named Walid. Walid was shot in the face with a rubber bullet. The wound was less than a centimetre away from his left eye. It was blind luck that allowed him to keep his eye. Another boy treated by our PRCS colleagues earlier in the evening had lost one of his eyes due to a similar injury. As I watched Andy and Rajah, one of our PRCS colleagues, expertly repair Walid’s young face, I couldn’t help but think of that other boy who was not as lucky as him. I wondered whether the people who turned their guns on these children ever considered what impact losing an eye would have on a 14-year-old.
As the sun set, it was time for iftar, the breaking of the day’s fast. We shared a meal with our colleagues and enjoyed a moment of calm.
But the calm did not last long. Soon, there was a big influx of ambulances. Fifteen patients arrived in 10 minutes. The team quickly assessed them, treated those in need of immediate assistance and identified those who need to be transferred to hospital. We saw someone with a shrapnel injury to the neck, and another with a possible collapsed lung from being beaten with a rifle. There was also an older man with a head injury whose decreasing level of consciousness made us suspect a brain bleed.
As I worked, I smelt “skunk water” – unmistakable, rancid. “Skunk” is a chemical agent that smells like a mix of excrement and rotting flesh. The Israeli police routinely fire it from water cannon.
Maha, a young woman, was being rushed into a treatment cubicle. She had been shot in the buttock with a rubber bullet. She told us how she fell after being shot, injured her elbow and finally got sprayed with skunk water as she laid on the ground. The chemical was on her face, on her hijab, her clothing. The smell was so intense that it caused her to vomit. She was not only injured, but all her dignity was taken from her.
My eyes started to fill with tears, partly from the smell and party from witnessing what has been done to her. I wiped my eyes and treated her.
Then there was a lull. We heard that ambulances were being restricted from entering parts of the Old City and wondered whether there were patients that needed our help but could not reach us. Thankfully, whatever the issue was, it was resolved quickly. Another group of patients soon entered the clinic, and we rushed to assess and treat them.
We continued our work until another MSF team arrived to take the next shift. Our colleagues from PRCS, however, just kept going. They told us that they would stay the night if they had to.
I cannot understate the incredible work of the paramedics we worked alongside on Monday. For days they have been managing the casualties from this particular escalation, and they have been successfully managing the complex pre-hospital needs of this vulnerable population for many, many years.  There are not words to describe the impact of their work and the resilience and light they bring.
The narrative that those impacted by this violence are somehow deserving of it is wrong. The people I saw and treated on Monday were children and women and men just like me and my family. These are humans who just happen to be Palestinian.
*All names of patients have been changed
The views expressed in this article are the author’s own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera’s editorial stance.







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Human rights groups call on Australia to drop pursuit of Israel trade deal over Palestine conflict | Australia news From “World news | The Guardian”



Australian and Palestinian human rights groups have urged the federal government to stop pursuing a potential free trade agreement with Israel and condemn its actions in Gaza and East Jerusalem.The Australian government is considering strengthening its trade relations with Israel, including through a possible FTA, hoping such a deal would boost defence, cybersecurity and innovation.Trade between the countries is already worth about $1.3bn, with Australian exports to Israel worth about $345m and imports $1.02bn.But the deteriorating situation in the region has prompted the Australian Centre for International Justice and the Palestinian Human Rights Organisations Council to urge the Australian government to walk away from considerations of expanded trade with Israel and condemn its actions in Gaza and East Jerusalem.The death toll in Gaza, according to the Gaza health ministry, was 48, including 14 children. A further 300 were wounded.Six people have been killed in Israel.Israel has carried out hundreds of airstrikes in Gaza and multiple rocket barrages were launched by Palestinian militant groups at Tel Aviv, Beersheba and other central Israeli cities. The United Nations has warned of the potential for full-scale war and has pleaded for restraint and de-escalation.Australia’s Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade is conducting a feasibility study into the potential for increased trade with Israel. In a submission to the study, the Australian Centre for International Justice and the Palestinian Human Rights Organisations Council say the government “must not neglect major human rights concerns, and Australia’s obligations and responsibilities under international law”.The submission calls on Australia to urgently review all trade with Israel and “implement effective measures to protect the Palestinian people’s fundamental human rights”.Raji Sourani, director of the Gaza-based Palestinian Centre for Human Rights, called for Australia to “change track” and condemn Israel’s actions. He said in a statement that “every centimetre in Gaza is shaking” and that the international community, including Australia, must be ashamed.“The situation is bleak, it’s unprecedented,” Sourani said. “Even in the numerous tragic and military assaults we have been subjected to in the past, Israel has launched the worst attack ever.”Rawan Arraf, the Australian Centre for International Justice’s executive director, said Australia was rewarding Israel with free trade despite it crippling life in Gaza and launching a “further military assault directed at civilian targets”.“Over several years, the Australian government has adopted an adverse and harmful approach to Palestinian human rights, whether that’s at the UN or its appalling intervention at the international criminal court at the request of the Israeli government, to prevent investigations into international crimes in Palestine,” she said.Both the foreign affairs minister, Marise Payne, and the shadow foreign affairs minister, Penny Wong, called on Wednesday for a de-escalation from both sides.Payne said Australia was “deeply concerned” by the violence in East Jerusalem and called on “all leaders to take immediate steps to halt violence and restore calm”.“The focus of all parties must be on a return to genuine peace negotiations to define a just, durable & resilient peace agreement,” Payne tweeted.Wong said Labor had been a strong supporter of “the rights of Israelis and Palestinians” to live in secure and recognised borders.“Labor is deeply distressed by recent violence and incitement in Jerusalem including unacceptable attacks on worshippers and rocket attacks,” she tweeted. “Labor calls on all sides to de-escalate.”The Department of Foreign Affairs and Trade’s feasibility study into stronger trade ties with Israel is expected to be finalised by July. The trade minister, Dan Tehan, has previously said he wants to “move to something of more substance by end of the year”.The Australia/Israel & Jewish Affairs Council (Aijac) is strongly supportive of the trade expansion. In a submission to the study, it commended Tehan’s “foresight in proposing a feasibility study on strengthening trade and investment with Israel with a view to a future free trade agreement”.“Aijac believes a proposed free trade agreement between Australia and Israel can look beyond merchandise exchanges to consider trade more broadly – in terms of shared knowledge, technological collaboration and a gateway for each country to the other’s region,” the council’s submission said. “These collaborations are already being built but are largely based on strong people-to-people links and state-based initiatives. Commonwealth-level support via a significantly upgraded trade relationship would enhance these collaborations, both in quantity and quality.”The council wants stronger trade in areas of national priority, like innovation, defence and cyber-security, enhanced access to each others’ markets through a free trade agreement, which would leave “Australian business well-placed to reach a large market in the Middle East”.The council is also hopeful of increased collaboration on shared challenges such as water security, bio and medical research and digital technologies.In a separate media release, Aijac condemned the rocket attacks from Gaza, saying they had targeted civilians.“The targeting of civilians is a war crime and is never acceptable, but the latest violence is particularly egregious,” Aijac’s chair, Mark Leibler, said.Aijac called on the “entire international community” to condemn the attacks.







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Migrant children in US living in mass shelters, little oversight | Human Rights News From “Al Jazeera – Breaking News, World News and Video from Al Jazeera”



The Biden administration is holding tens of thousands of asylum-seeking children in an opaque network of some 200 facilities that spans two dozen states and includes five shelters with more than 1,000 children packed inside, according to the Associated Press news agency.
Confidential data obtained by the AP shows the number of migrant children in government custody more than doubled in the past two months, and this week the federal government was housing around 21,000 kids, from toddlers to teens.
A facility at Fort Bliss, a US Army post in El Paso, Texas, had more than 4,500 children as of Monday.
Lawyers, advocates and mental health experts say that while some shelters are safe and provide adequate care, others are endangering children’s health and safety.
“It’s almost like ‘Groundhog Day,’” said Southern Poverty Law Center lawyer Luz Lopez, referring to the 1993 film in which events appear to be continually repeating.
The Biden administration had previously faced criticism for holding unaccompanied migrant children in crowded US Customs and Border Protection facilities for too long before transferring them to HHS shelters more equipped to offer care [File: Dario Lopez-Mills/Reuters]“Here we are back to a point almost where we started, where the government is using taxpayer money to build large holding facilities … for children instead of using that money to find ways to more quickly reunite children with their sponsors.”
A US Department of Health and Human Services spokesman, Mark Weber, said the department’s staff and contractors are working hard to keep children in their custody safe and healthy.
A few of the current practices are the same as those that President Joe Biden and others criticised under the administration of former president Donald Trump, including not vetting some caregivers with full FBI fingerprint background checks.
At the same time, court records show the Biden administration is working to settle several multimillion-dollar lawsuits that claim migrant children were abused in shelters under Trump.
Part of the government’s plan to manage thousands of children crossing the US-Mexico border involves about a dozen unlicensed emergency facilities inside military installations, stadiums and convention centres that skirt state regulations and do not require traditional legal oversight.

Inside the facilities, called Emergency Intake Sites, children are not guaranteed access to education, recreational opportunities or legal counsel.
Some of the facilities currently holding children are run by contractors already facing lawsuits claiming that children were physically and sexually abused in their shelters under the Trump administration, while others are new companies with little or no experience working with migrant children.
In a recent news release, the administration touted its “restoration of a child centered focus for unaccompanied children,” and it has been sharing daily totals of the number of children in government custody as well as a few photos of the facilities. This reflects a higher level of transparency than the Trump administration.
In addition, the amount of time children spend, on average, inside the system has dropped from four months last fall (autumn) to less than a month this spring, according to the Department of Health and Human Services.
Nonetheless, the agency has received reports of abuse that resulted in a handful of contract staffers being dismissed from working at the emergency sites this year, according to an official who was not authorised to discuss the matter publicly and spoke on the condition of anonymity.
‘No one would tell me any information’
Lawyers say sometimes, even parents cannot figure out where their children are.
Jose, a father who fled El Salvador after his village was targeted in a massacre, requested asylum in the US four years ago.
He had hoped to welcome his wife and eight-year-old daughter to Southern California this year, but the pair were turned around at the border in March and expelled to Mexico.
The little girl crossed again by herself and was placed in the government shelter in Brownsville, Texas, on April 6.
Jose called a government hotline set up for parents seeking their migrant children repeatedly but said no one would tell him where she was.
“I was so upset because I kept calling and calling, and no one would tell me any information about where she was,” said Jose, who asked to be identified only by his first name out of fear of endangering his immigration case.
“Finally they told me I had to pay $1,300 to cover her airplane ticket and if I didn’t pay, I would have to wait a month more, and I was so anxious.”

For nearly three weeks, his daughter was held inside the Brownsville facility before finally being released to him in late April after an advocacy organisation intervened to get the government to foot the bill for her airfare, as is required by the agency.
HHS declined to say whether there are any legally enforceable standards for caring for children housed at the emergency sites or how they are being monitored.
The Biden administration has allowed very limited access to news media once children are brought into facilities, citing the coronavirus pandemic and privacy restrictions.
“HHS has worked as swiftly as possible to increase bed capacity and to ensure potential sponsors can provide a safe home while the child goes through their immigration proceedings,” HHS spokesman Weber said in a statement.
“As soon as wrap around services – on-site primary care, including childhood immunizations and physicals, case management, phone calls to family members, education, recreation etc – become available as a result of additional infrastructure and staff, they are provided as part of the operation.”
Weber confirmed a number of specific shelter populations from the data the AP obtained.
‘Very dysfunctional’
Of particular concern to advocates are mass shelters, with hundreds of beds apiece. These facilities can leave children isolated, less supervised and without basic services.
The AP found about half of all migrant children detained in the US are sleeping in shelters with more than 1,000 other children. More than 17,650 are in facilities with 100 or more children. Some shelters and foster programmes are small, little more than a house with a handful of kids.
A large Houston facility abruptly closed last month after it was revealed that children were being given plastic bags instead of access to restrooms.
“The system has been very dysfunctional, and it’s getting worse,” said Amy Cohen, a child psychiatrist and executive director of the nonprofit Every Last One, which works to help immigrant families fleeing violence in Central America. Although there have been large numbers of children arriving in the US for years, Cohen said she has never seen the situation as bad as it is today.
Cohen described parents receiving calls from people refusing to identify themselves.

They are told to be at an airport or bus station in the next two hours to pick up their children, who have been held for more than a month without notice, or they would not be released.
Some parents are told to pay a travel agency thousands of dollars to have their child sent to them, she said.
“The children are coming out sick, with COVID, infested with lice, and it will not surprise me to see children dying as a consequence, as we saw during the Trump years,” Cohen said. “The Biden administration is feverishly putting up these pop-up detention facilities, many of which have no experience working with children.”
One reason so many children are now arriving without their parents dates back to a 2020 Trump administration emergency order that essentially closed the US-Mexico border to all migrants, citing public health concerns about spreading COVID-19.
That emergency order still applies to adults, but the Biden administration has begun allowing children travelling without their parents to stay and seek asylum if they enter the country. As a result, some parents are sending their kids across the border by themselves.
Most already have a parent or other adult relative or family friend, known as a sponsor, in the US waiting to receive them. But first, they are typically detained by US Customs and Border Protection, or CBP, then turned over to a government shelter.
“As much as having children spend days on end at CBP is unacceptable, so, too, is having children spend weeks on end in unlicensed Emergency Intake Sites,” said National Center for Youth Law lawyer Neha Desai. “With every passing day, it is increasingly critical that these children are released to sponsors or transferred to licensed facilities.”







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Activist’s killing triggers protests in Iraq’s Karbala | Human Rights News From “Al Jazeera – Breaking News, World News and Video from Al Jazeera”



Protesters have burned tyres and blocked roads in the Iraqi city of Karbala after a prominent civil activist was killed by unknown gunmen.
Ihab Jawad Al-Wazni was killed in the early hours of Sunday near his home in the predominantly Shia city, according to a statement by the Iraqi defence ministry. No group claimed responsibility.
Al-Wazni, a leading figure in protests against the government in the city, was buried on Sunday morning.
Witnesses said hundreds of people took to the streets in Karbala in demonstrations condemning the activist’s assassination.
Protesters blocked a number of main roads in the city and demanded security forces find and identify al-Wazni’s killers, and threatened to escalate protests if the perpetrators were not exposed.
“The killer parties are well known. Today all Iraqis even kids know which party is carrying out the killings. It is armed militias supported by regional countries and the whole world knows who it is,” said Zeid al-Sumeri, a protester from Karbala.
No justice
The killing of al-Wazni is seen by Iraqis as a message by militias affiliated with political parties that they will not back down from criticism.
“Ihab al-Wazni’s blood wasn’t in vain… Your blood wasn’t wasted,” said one protester.
About 30 activists have died in targeted killings and dozens of others abducted, some detained briefly, since October 2019. Such assassinations are normally carried out in the dead of night by men on motorcycles, and nobody claims responsibility.
Activists and the UN repeatedly blame “militias”.
Karbala Governor Nassif al-Khattabi on Sunday ordered security forces in the city to be on alert in an effort to arrest the suspects, a statement by his office said.
Hundreds of demonstrators also took to the streets in the city of Nasiriya, capital of the southern province of Dhi Qar, closing down a number of main roads to protest the killing.
Iraq has witnessed sporadic protests since October 2019 over poor economic conditions and financial and political corruption.
Government figures indicate that 565 protesters and security personnel were killed during the demonstrations, among them dozens of activists assassinated by unknown gunmen.
Iraqi Prime Minister Mustafa al-Kadhimi has pledged to prosecute those involved in the killing of protesters and activists, but no perpetrators have been brought to justice so far.
Al-Wazni challenged al-Kadhimi in a Facebook post in February, asking rhetorically: “Do you know what is going on? You know that they kidnap and kill – or you live in another country?”







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Myanmar military designates shadow gov’t as ‘terrorist’ group | Human Rights News From “Al Jazeera – Breaking News, World News and Video from Al Jazeera”



A group including deposed lawmakers formed the ‘National Unity Government’ to oppose the military government.Myanmar’s military rulers have branded a group of deposed lawmakers running a shadow government as “terrorists”, and blamed it for bombings, arson and killings, state-controlled media said on Saturday.
Since the military seized power in a February 1 coup, detaining and deposing civilian leader Aung San Suu Kyi, a nationwide uprising has refused to back down on its demands for a return to democracy.
Bombings are reported daily and local militias have been formed to confront the army while anti-military protests have been maintained across the Southeast Asian country and strikes by opponents of the coup have paralysed the economy.
The National Unity Government (NUG), which operates under cover and itself describes the army as a “terrorist force”, announced this week that it would set up a People’s Defence Force to protect its supporters from violence instigated by the military government.
A nationwide uprising in Myanmar has refused to back down on its demands for a return to democracy after the military seized power on February 1 [AP]Myanmar state television MRTV announced that the NUG, a committee of deposed lawmakers known as the CRPH, and the new force would all now be covered by the anti-terrorism law.
“Their acts caused so much terrorism in many places,” the announcement said.
“There were bombs, fires, murder and threats to destroy the administrative mechanism of the government,” the announcement said.
Meanwhile, anti-coup protesters again marched against the military government across the country on Saturday.
At least 774 civilians have been killed by security forces and 3,778 are in prison, according to the Assistance Association for Political Prisoners activist group.
The military government disputes those figures and says at least two dozen members of the security forces have been killed in protests.
Fighting has also flared on Myanmar’s periphery with ethnic armies that have been fighting for decades, some of which have rallied behind the protesters. State television said the army had advanced against the Kachin Independence Army in northern Myanmar, but there was no independent confirmation.
In western Myanmar, the newly formed Chinland Defence Force said it had overrun an army camp. The army made no comment on the report.
The military has defended its power grab, alleging fraud in the November election, which was won by Aung San Suu Kyi’s party in a landslide.
Journalists potential targets
The new designation means anyone speaking to the groups – including journalists – can be subjected to charges under counterterrorism laws.
The Arakan Army – a rebel group that had clashed with the military in conflict-wracked Rakhine state – held the designation last year, and a journalist who had interviewed a high-ranking representative was arrested.
He faced “terrorism” charges, carrying penalties ranging from three years to life in prison.
While he was released not long after, the use of the counterterrorism law against journalists sparked fears of a tightening noose around the country’s embattled press.
Dozens of journalists have been arrested in the wake of the coup, while media outlets have shut down and various broadcasting licences have been revoked for some TV stations – placing the country under an information blackout.







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Death toll from police raid in Rio de Janeiro favela rises to 28 | Human Rights News From “Al Jazeera – Breaking News, World News and Video from Al Jazeera”



Amnesty International says anti-drug trafficking operation in Jacarezinho favela ‘reprehensible and unjustifiable’.The death toll from a Brazilian police raid this week in a Rio de Janeiro favela has increased to 28, a police official said late on Friday, as international human rights groups condemned the violence.
One police officer and 27 people were killed in the raid early on Thursday, which authorities said aimed to root out drug traffickers in Jacarezinho, an impoverished community in the city’s North Zone.
It was the deadliest police operation ever carried out in Rio de Janeiro.
“Intelligence confirmed that the dead were drug dealers. They fired at officers, to kill. They had orders to confront,” Civil Police Chief Allan Turnowski told reporters.
Brazilian officials have identified the 48-year-old officer who died, but none of the others killed in the operation – raising concerns from rights groups and residents who have condemned the police for using excessive force.
“The number of people killed in this police operation is reprehensible, as is the fact that, once again, this massacre took place in a favela,” Jurema Werneck, executive director of Amnesty International Brazil, said in a statement.
People protest against the deadly police raid in Jacarezinho favela in Rio de Janeiro [Mauro Pimentel/AFP]“Even if the victims were suspected of criminal association, which has not been proven, summary executions of this kind are entirely unjustifiable. The police have the power to arrest but the courts have the duty to prosecute and judge those suspected of committing crimes.”
The office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) also condemned the violence, saying it “furthers a long-standing trend of unnecessary and disproportionate use of force” by Brazilian police in the favelas.
The favelas are home to poor, marginalised and predominantly Afro-Brazilian residents, OHCHR Spokesman Rupert Colville said in a statement on Friday.
“We have received worrying reports that after the events, the police did not take steps to preserve evidence at the crime scene, which could hinder investigations into this lethal operation,” he said.
Colville urged the Brazilian authorities to launch “an independent, thorough and impartial investigation” into what happened.
Brazil’s Supreme Court issued a ruling last year banning most of such police actions during the COVID-19 pandemic, which has ravaged the South American nation and led to more than 400,000 deaths – the second highest tally in the world.







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