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Biden cancels Trump’s planned ‘Garden of American Heroes’ | Donald Trump News From “Al Jazeera – Breaking News, World News and Video from Al Jazeera”



The former president proposed the monument last year to honor dozens of American historical figures.President Joe Biden on Friday put the kibosh on his predecessor’s planned “National Garden of American Heroes” and revoked former President Donald Trump’s executive orders aimed at social media companies’ moderation policies and branding American foreign aid.
In an executive order of his own, Biden abolished the Trump-formed task force to create the new monument, which the former president proposed last year. It was to have featured sculptures of dozens of American historical figures, including presidents, athletes and pop culture icons, envisioned by Trump as “a vast outdoor park that will feature the statues of the greatest Americans to ever live.”
Trump himself curated the list of 30-plus, which included Davy Crockett, Billy Graham, Whitney Houston, Harriet Tubman and Antonin Scalia, among others, but no site was selected and the garden was never funded by Congress.
Trump repeatedly condemned the desecration and toppling of historic statues by demonstrators during protests against racial injustice and police brutality following the death of George Floyd in Minneapolis last year.

“We will raise the next generation of American patriots,” Trump said during a speech last July at Mount Rushmore where he announced his idea for the garden. “We will write the next thrilling chapter of the American adventure. And we will teach our children to know that they live in a land of legends, that nothing can stop them, and that no one can hold them down.”
Trump’s executive order establishing the garden said priority should be given to monuments to former presidents, to individuals and events relating to the European discovery of North America, the founding of the United States, and the abolition of slavery.
“None will have lived perfect lives, but all will be worth honoring, remembering, and studying,” the now-cancelled order stated.
Other Trump executive actions revoked
Biden’s order also revoked Trump’s May 2020 order calling for the Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission to investigate social media companies for labelling or removing posts or entire accounts in what Trump claimed was a restriction on free speech. That order came before Trump himself was removed from platforms like Twitter and Facebook after the January 6 insurrection at the Capitol.
The president also ended Trump’s December 2020 order to brand all US foreign aid with a single “logo that embodies the values and generosity of the American people”.

Also revoked was Trump’s June 2020 order that called for the federal government to “prosecute to the fullest extent permitted under Federal law” acts of vandalism and destruction to statues on federal property. That order came in response to the defacement of statues — particularly those honouring the Confederacy — during nationwide protests against racial injustice following the killing of George Floyd while in police custody.
Biden also took aim at a Trump proclamation that required immigrants to prove they would be covered by certain health insurance plans within 30 days of entering the US or prove they could cover medical costs.
“My Administration is committed to expanding access to quality, affordable healthcare,” Biden said in revoking that proclamation. “We can achieve that objective, however, without barring the entry of noncitizens who seek to immigrate lawfully to this country but who lack significant financial means or have not purchased health insurance coverage from a restrictive list of qualifying plans.”







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Arizona audit of 2020 votes has ‘QAnon problem’: Report | Donald Trump News From “Al Jazeera – Breaking News, World News and Video from Al Jazeera”



Arizona’s audit of the ballots cast in the 2020 presidential election could have a “QAnon problem”, according to watchdog organisaton Media Matters.
The state’s Republican-controlled Senate ordered the review of Maricopa County’s roughly 2.1 million ballots in April, following months of unfounded claims of voter fraud made by former President Donald Trump, his supporters and fringe groups that they say cost him the election.
Joe Biden was the first Democratic presidential candidate to win Arizona since 1996, winning with a margin of about 10,000 votes out of the 3.3 million cast, contributing to Biden’s Electoral College victory.
The ballots and computer hard drives containing data regarding the vote counts were seized and given to Cyber Ninjas, the company chosen to oversee the audit by the Arizona Senate.
Cyber Ninjas has “no election experience” and is run by Doug Logan, “a man who has shared unfounded conspiracy theories claiming the official 2020 presidential election results are illegitimate”, the Associated Press reported.
Many of these theories were put forward by QAnon, a wide-ranging set of conspiratorial ideas that are based around the notion Trump was chosen to fight a liberal “Deep State” cabal that harvests the blood of children to remain young.
Maricopa County ballots cast in the 2020 general election are fenced in a secure area as a box is delivered to be examined and recounted by contractors working for Florida-based company, Cyber Ninjas, on May 6, 2021 [File: Matt York/Pool via AP Photo]These conspiracies are thought to have played a motivating factor in the January 6 insurrection that saw Trump’s supporters storm the US Capitol in order to stop a joint session of Congress from certifying Biden’s victory.
According to the Media Matters report, authored by Olivia Little, “it appears the evidence underpinning that effort and much of the work to generate support for it has come from two QAnon followers, Liz Harris and Bobby Piton.”
Media Matters says Harris and Piton enjoy “roles of influence as two of the main promoters of the Arizona election fraud conspiracy theory, working behind the scenes” with authorities.
A report by the Arizona Republic cited by Media Matters claims Harris and Piton are influential figures in the audit.
Harris ran as a Republican for the Arizona House of Representatives in 2020, but lost. She runs “grassroots” efforts to find voter fraud and “commonly livestreams multiple videos per day related to the Arizona audit on YouTube and Facebook”, according to Media Matters.
Piton is the head of an investment planning firm in Illinois.
Media Matters also says the three appear to be connected. It cites Piton’s claims on the far-right social media platform Gab he would give his research on alleged voter fraud in Maricopa to Logan, “the person who won the bid to perform the audit”.
Piton confirmed to The Daily Beast in April he was working on the audit in an “unofficial capacity” after Logan requested his assistance. Piton also appeared on YouTube, praying a rosary for Logan and Harris.
A sticker that references the QAnon slogan is seen on a truck that participated in a caravan convoy in Adairsville, Georgia on September 5, 2020 [File: Elijah Nouvelage/Reuters]His Facebook account appears to have shared numerous images in support of Trump and others challenging the 2020 election results that originated from QAnon groups, according to the report. Some feature QAnon slogan WWG1WGA, which stands for “Where We Go One, We Go All”.
Harris’s social media accounts feature similar content, the report says.
Media Matters said Piton “livestreamed what appears” to have been “a private Zoom meeting about the election audit between Harris, [Representative] Andy Biggs, members of the Arizona Senate, and himself”.
Broader concerns
The audit has come under criticism for continuing conspiracy theories and concerns about its methods.
The US Department of Justice’s Civil Rights Division has written to Arizona’s Republican Senate President Karen Fann that the seizure of the ballots may run afoul of federal law requiring ballots to remain in the control of elections officials for 22 months.
Principal Deputy Assistant US Attorney General Pamela Karlan wrote: “Past experience with similar investigative efforts around the country has raised concerns that they can be directed at minority voters, which potentially can implicate the anti-intimidation prohibitions of the Voting Rights Act … Such investigative efforts can have a significant intimidating effect on qualified voters that can deter them from seeking to vote in the future.”
Jennifer Morrell, a partner at Elections Group, a consulting firm advising state and local election officials, which has not worked in Arizona, told the AP, “I think the activities that are taking place here are reckless and they in no way, shape or form resemble an audit.”

Cyber Ninjas did not immediately respond to Al Jazeera’s request for comment. A call to Piton’s investment planning firm was not answered.
Harris told Al Jazeera in a text message: “The fact that you are reporting on this tells me you are part of the problem”.
Media Matters said “Harris and Piton’s involvement in the Arizona election audit is more than concerning – if their claims of working with audit officials and Arizona senators are true, it means that an attempt to overturn Arizona’s election results has been quietly influenced by two QAnon followers working from within.”
Arizona Republicans do not appear to be concerned. The Arizona Senate signed a lease to continue the audit on Friday. The lease lasts through the end of June.







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Will allegiance to Trump boost or doom the Republican Party? | Donald Trump News From “Al Jazeera – Breaking News, World News and Video from Al Jazeera”



US House Republicans’ swift sacking of Representative Liz Cheney, a vocal critic of former President Donald Trump, from her leadership post as the party’s conference chairwoman on Wednesday is the clearest signal yet that the GOP is pledging strict allegiance to Trump.
The vast majority of Republican leaders have made it clear in the months following Trump’s departure from the White House that they believe the former president still has coattails they can ride to electoral victory in next year’s midterms and, possibly, reclaim control of the House and Senate.
“If you try to drive him out of the Republican party, half the people will leave,” Senator Lindsey Graham, a staunch supporter of Trump, told Fox News on Tuesday. “It doesn’t mean you can’t criticise the president. It means the Republican Party cannot go forward without President Trump being part of it.”
Countering Graham, Republican Trump critic Senator Mitt Romney, tweeted on Tuesday, “Expelling Liz Cheney from leadership won’t gain the GOP one additional voter, but it will cost us quite a few.”

Expelling Liz Cheney from leadership won’t gain the GOP one additional voter, but it will cost us quite a few.
— Mitt Romney (@MittRomney) May 10, 2021

As contradictory as it may sound, there is truth in both of their statements.
Individual Republican self-preservation
Looking at Graham’s comments through the lens of individual Republicans, his point is spot on.
Republicans across the country vying to win their primaries against other Republicans, whether they are new candidates or running for re-election, are unlikely to succeed if they are not toeing the Trump line or worse, outright criticising the former president.
Elected Republicans who have dared cross Trump, either verbally or by supporting his February impeachment, have been censured or reprimanded by local and state parties.
Some, such as Cheney, have drawn a long list of pro-Trump primary challengers. Others, like Romney, have been jeered by home-state Republicans.

Republican Senator Mitt Romney was met with a chorus of boos when he addressed a GOP convention in his home state of Utah pic.twitter.com/cnbnI6euQW
— Reuters (@Reuters) May 2, 2021

As most Republican politicians process these reactions to Trump critics and study the polls which continue to show Trump has the support of about eight-in-10 Republicans, it is not shocking that most are avoiding antagonising the former president as they eye their own political futures.
Risky strategy for general election
So, when Romney says the Cheney saga “won’t gain the GOP one additional voter, but it will cost us quite a few”, what is he trying to say?
He’s talking about next November’s general election, not the primaries that come before them.

Anybody who studies US general elections knows that party control of Congress is won and lost on Election Day in the dozens of toss-up battleground districts, where the races tend to be very close and highly competitive.
In other words, Romney’s point is if Republicans want to reclaim the majority next year, he believes they will need to appeal to a broader swath of voters – including independents and perhaps some Democrats – not just an ardent base of Trump supporters.
Referendum on the current president or the last one?
Over the past four mid-term elections, going back to 2006, the party in control of the White House has lost seats in the House and Senate and has lost control of at least one chamber of Congress. And in each of those elections, the party out of power successfully turned the congressional contests, at least in part, into a referendum on the sitting president.
Democrats picked up the House in 2006 and 2018 by focusing their campaigns on Presidents George W Bush and Donald Trump respectively, incessantly bashing what were two unpopular presidencies at the time. Bush held a 38 percent approval rating according to Gallup, thanks to his handling of the Iraq War, and Trump was at 40 percent amid his extremely polarised tenure.
For their part, Republicans won the House in 2010 and the Senate in 2014 as they slammed President Barack Obama – whose approval rating in both years was about 45 percent – and his Affordable Care Act healthcare plan.

The question for Republicans in 2022 is: Will they be able to frame the mid-terms as a referendum on President Joe Biden or will their obsession with Trump remind battleground voters of the generally unpopular former president?
Republicans are already trying to paint Biden and Democrats as outside the mainstream on economic and cultural issues, while attempting to pin the blame of the growing migrant crisis at the US-Mexico border on the president.
But their actions regarding Trump, not to mention his obsession with relitigating his election loss – 15 out of the 28 statements he posted on his website this month were about the election or hammered his GOP critics – are drawing attention from their statements on Democrats. In fact, Trump only criticised Biden’s policies three times in those 28 statements.
It is folly to try to predict what will happen in November 2022’s 469 US House and Senate elections, especially 18 months ahead of time. But Democrats, in their effort to buck history and maintain their razor-thin majorities, are more than eager to let their opponents turn the fight into a referendum on Trump and minimise the scrutiny of their own potentially politically polarising policies.
To Democrats – and Republicans like Romney – that is a recipe for Republican failure.








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Donald Trump Egged On Capitol Rioters: Facebook Panel Co-Chair From “NDTV News – World-news”



Trump was suspended from Facebook and Instagram after posting a video during the attack(FILE)Washington: Donald Trump encouraged the Capitol rioters and so earned his Facebook ban, but the social media giant’s rules are in “shambles” and need fixing, the co-chair of the network’s oversight panel said Sunday.The panel agreed just days ago that Facebook was right to oust the ex-president for his comments regarding the deadly January 6 rampage, though it sidestepped an overall decision on whether he will ever be allowed back.”He issued these statements which were just egging on — with perfunctory asking for peace — but mostly he was just egging them on to continue,” oversight body co-chair Michael McConnell told Fox News Sunday.Trump was suspended from Facebook and Instagram after posting a video during the attack by his fired-up supporters challenging his election loss, in which he told them: “We love you, you’re very special.””He (Trump) bears responsibility for his own situation. He put himself in this bed and he can sleep in it,” McConnell added.However, the panel gave the company six months to justify why his ban should be permanent — leaving a grenade in Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg’s lap on the issue of free speech, and spotlighting weaknesses in the platform’s plan for self-regulation.”We gave them (Facebook) a certain amount of time to get… their house in order,” McConnell said. “They needed some time because their rules are shambles… They are unclear, they are internally inconsistent.”McConnell, a constitutional law professor at Stanford, noted that the social media giant was not violating Trump’s free speech rights.- ‘Facebook is not a government’ -“The simple willing answer is private companies are not bound by the First Amendment,” he said referring the US constitution. “He’s a customer. Facebook is not a government, and he is not a citizen of Facebook.”In its ruling, the oversight board — envisioned by Zuckerberg as the equivalent of a “supreme court” for thorny content decisions — made additional recommendations on dealing with potentially harmful content from world leaders.The panel “called on Facebook to address widespread confusion about how decisions relating to influential users are made” and said “considerations of newsworthiness should not take priority when urgent action is needed to prevent significant harm.”Twitter has permanently suspended Trump after the Capitol riot, saying there was a risk he would further incite violence, due to his multiple tweets disputing Joe Biden’s presidential election victory.Twitter on Thursday confirmed that it had pulled the plug on several Trump-linked accounts trying to skirt the ban.Social media had been key to Trump’s political success, letting him fire off comments without having to explain or back claims.At a recent hearing on Capitol Hill, US lawmakers unleashed criticism at the leaders of the top social networks, and promised new regulations.Zuckerberg, Twitter’s Jack Dorsey, and Google’s Sundar Pichai faced questions from lawmakers who blamed their platforms for political extremism, drug abuse, teen suicides and more.Zuckerberg reiterated his belief that private companies should not be the judges of truth when it comes to what people say.(This story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)







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Matt Gaetz, Marjorie Taylor Greene take mantle of Donald Trump’s populism at rally From “World News Headlines, Latest International News, World Breaking News – Times of India”



US Reps. Matt Gaetz and Marjorie Taylor Greene kicked off their “America First Rally” roadshow. AP photoTHE VILLAGES: US Reps. Matt Gaetz and Marjorie Taylor Greene, two of the Republican Party’s most controversial figures, kicked off their “America First Rally” roadshow Friday with a Trump-centric revival of sorts for the MAGA faithful at a Florida retirement community. The gathering appeared to be an attempt to position the two conservatives as successors to the former president’s populism. “Tell me, who is your president?”” Greene shouted after walking out onto a ballroom stage in front of hundreds of supporters wearing “Trump” T-shirts and “Make America Great Again” red ballcaps. “Trump!” the mask-less crowd of retirees wearing MAGA red yelled back. Joking that he was a “marked man in Congress … but a Florida man,” Gaetz called former President Donald Trump “the undisputed leader of the Republican Party.” “Today, we send a strong message to the weak establishment in both parties: America First isn’t going away. We are going on tour,” Gaetz said. “It’s no longer the red team against the blue team. It’s the establishment against the rest of us.” Gaetz held up himself and Greene as challengers to the establishment and successors to Trump’s populism. “They lie about us because we tell the truth about them,” Gaetz said of the establishment. The indoor rally took place with just a week until Gaetz associate Joel Greenberg faces a deadline to enter a plea deal that could lead to damaging information against the Florida congressman. Gaetz alluded to the investigation by referencing what he said were distorted descriptions of himself as someone who has wild parties with beautiful women. Both Republican members of the House of Representatives have come under fire in recent months, though for different reasons. What began as an inquiry into sex trafficking allegations and whether Gaetz paid women and an underage girl in exchange for sex has grown into a larger review of public corruption. Federal investigators are looking at whether Gaetz and his associates tried to secure government jobs for some of the women. They are also scrutinizing Gaetz’s connections to the medical marijuana sector. Greenberg, a former local tax collector, has been accused of trafficking a minor for sex and faces a May 15 deadline to strike a plea deal with prosecutors. If he does, Greenberg may be pressed to cooperate with federal investigators and deliver damaging information against Gaetz. Greene, a congresswoman from Georgia, was stripped of her congressional assignments last February for incendiary social media posts expressing racist views, pushing absurd conspiracy theories and endorsing threats of violence against elected officials The controversies made no difference to the 300 supporters, mostly retirees, who packed into a hotel ballroom to listen them. A long line trailed outside the hotel with people who couldn’t get in once the ballroom reached capacity. The Villages, which was the fastest growing US metro area last year, has been a Republican bastion for decades and is often a must-stop destination for Republican presidential candidates. Inside the ballroom, the supporters danced and clapped to Laura Branigan’s “Gloria” and other 1980s hits and waved their arms, loudly chanting the lyrics of Queen’s “We Are the Champions,” before the politicians took the stage. At least a half dozen muscled security guards in identical olive shirts stood around the room. John Peil was in the crowd. He described the rally as a great way to cap off a day of golfing. Of Greene, Peil said, she was “a great woman” who wasn’t afraid to take on Democratic lawmakers in Congress. There was a double standard between when Democrats run into controversies and when Republicans do, he said. “They’re using a double standard on the two of them too,” Peil said, referring to the two House members. “It’s always the conservatives that get the dirt, and it’s always the liberals that speed away free.” Zach Hussein and Josh Labasbas held up a black banner that said “Antifacist Action” in front of the hotel where the rally was held until a police officer politely asked them to leave at the request of the property owner. A passerby told them, “Go back to Cuba.” FacebookTwitterLinkedinEMail







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Secret Service extension for Trump’s adult children cost $140,000 in a month | Donald Trump From “World news | The Guardian”



Donald Trump’s adult children reportedly cost taxpayers $140,000 in Secret Service security in the month after the clan’s patriarch left the White House in January.Ordinarily, family members of a president lose their security detail when they leave office. But in the case of the four Trump siblings and two of their spouses, the former president issued a directive to extend post-presidency protections by six months.The costs, obtained by the watchdog group Citizens for Ethics, do not include security protections at Trump properties in New Jersey, Palm Beach and Briarcliff, New York. With those factored in, the total would likely be far higher, according to the group.According to the watchdog, records reveal that the Trump children maintained a “breakneck speed of travel, and racked up significant hotel and transportation bills for the Secret Service”. Transport costs alone amounted to $52,296.75, and hotel costs totaled at least $88,678.39.If that schedule is maintained, the group estimates, post-presidency protection costs could nearly $1m. The group has previously calculated that the Trump family made 12 times as many trips in three years as the Obamas made in seven.The arrangements, however, are not unique: former presidents Bill Clinton, Barack Obama and George W Bush also sought protection extensions, though in the case of Clinton and Obama their children were by then at, or close to, college-age.The Washington Post, which reported on Trump’s directive in January, found that extensions to Secret Service protections were also extended to former treasury secretary Steven Mnuchin, former chief of staff Mark Meadows and former national security adviser Robert O’Brien.Under federal law, Trump and his wife Melania are entitled to protection for their lifetime; their teenage son Barron receives his until he turns 16.The watchdog found that Jared Kushner and Ivanka Trump went from their jobs at the White House to a 10-day vacation in Utah, racking up hotel costs of $62,599. After a month in Miami, they stayed at Trump’s Bedminster golf property for three days in late February.Eric and Lara Trump spent much of February at Trump’s Briarcliff property, interspersed with trips to New York, Miami and Palm Beach, at a cost of $12,742.Donald Trump Jr also spent time in New York City, on Long Island, and in upstate New York, racking up bills of $13,337.But Citizens for Ethics said the Secret Service did not provide records of spending at Trump businesses.“While it may be tempting to put the story of the Trump family’s profiteering in the past, we cannot until they have actually stopped directing taxpayer money into their own bank accounts,” the group said.







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Online speech shield under fire as Donald Trump’s Facebook ban stays From “World News Headlines, Latest International News, World Breaking News – Times of India”



Lurking beneath Facebook’s decision on whether to continue Donald Trump’s suspension from its platform is a far more complex and consequential question. AP PhotoWASHINGTON: Lurking beneath Facebook’s decision on whether to continue Donald Trump’s suspension from its platform is a far more complex and consequential question: Do the protections carved out for companies when the internet was in its infancy 25 years ago make sense when some of them have become global powerhouses with almost unlimited reach? The companies have provided a powerful megaphone for Trump, other world leaders and billions of users to air their grievances, even ones that are false or damaging to someone’s reputation, knowing that the platforms themselves were shielded from liability for content posted by users. Now that shield is getting a critical look in the current climate of hostility toward Big Tech and the social environment of political polarization, hate speech and violence against minorities. The debate is starting to take root in Congress, and the action this week by Facebook’s quasi-independent oversight board upholding the company’s suspension of Trump’s accounts could add momentum to that legislative effort. Under the 1996 Communications Decency Act, digital platform companies have legal protection both for content they carry and for removing postings they deem offensive. The shelter from lawsuits and prosecution applies to social media posts, uploaded videos, user reviews of restaurants or doctors, classified ads – or the doxing underworld of thousands of websites that profit from false and defamatory information on individuals. Section 230 of the law, which outlines the shield, was enacted when many of the most powerful social media companies didn’t even exist. It allowed companies like Facebook, Twitter and Google to grow into the behemoths they are today. Republicans accuse the social media platforms of suppressing conservative voices and giving a stage to foreign leaders branded as dictators, while Trump is barred. Democrats and civil rights groups decry the digital presence of far-right extremists and pin blame on the platforms for disseminating hate speech and stoking extremist violence. “For too long, social media platforms have hidden behind Section 230 protections to censor content that deviates from their beliefs,” Sen. Roger Wicker of Mississippi, the senior Republican on the Senate Commerce Committee, has said. On this, Trump and President Joe Biden apparently agree. Trump, while president, called for the repeal of Section 230, branding it “a serious threat to our national security and election integrity.” Biden said during his campaign that it “immediately should be revoked,” though he hasn’t spoken about the issue at length as president. Facebook, with a strong lobbying presence in Washington and a desire to have an input into any changes, has stepped out in favor of revisions to Section 230. Congress should update the 1996 law “to make sure it’s working as intended,” CEO Mark Zuckerberg has said. And he’s offered a specific suggestion: Congress could require internet platforms to gain legal protection only by proving that their systems for identifying illegal content are up to snuff. Some critics see a clever gambit in that, a requirement that could make it more difficult for smaller tech companies and startups to comply and would ultimately advantage Facebook over smaller competitors. Spokespeople for Twitter and Google declined to comment on the prospects for legislative action on Section 230 following the Facebook board ruling; a spokesperson for Menlo Park, California-based Facebook had no immediate comment. The decision announced by the Facebook oversight board upheld the suspension of Trump, an extremely rare move that was based on the company’s conclusion that he incited violence leading to the deadly Jan. 6 Capitol riot. But the overseers told Facebook to specify how long the suspension would last, saying its “indefinite” ban on the former president was unreasonable. The ruling, which gives Facebook six months to comply, effectively postpones any possible Trump reinstatement and puts the onus for that decision squarely back on the company. Trump was permanently banned after the riot from Twitter, his favored bullhorn. But it was Facebook that played an integral role in both of Trump’s campaigns, not just as a way to speak to his more than 32 million followers but also as a fundraising juggernaut driving small-dollar contributions through highly targeted ads. Critics of Facebook generally saw the oversight board’s ruling as positive. But some view the board as a distraction by Facebook to skirt its responsibility and to stave off action by Congress or the Biden administration. What must be addressed, critics insist, are the broader problems for society from the fearsome power, market dominance and underlying business model of Facebook and the other tech giants – harvesting data from platform users and making it available to online advertisers so they can pinpoint consumers to target. That’s where the debate over changes to Section 230 comes in, as a key area for new regulation of social media. Gautam Hans, a technology law and free-speech expert and professor at Vanderbilt University, said he finds the board to be “a bit of a sideshow from the larger policy and social questions that we have about these companies.” FacebookTwitterLinkedinEMail







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Twitter Shuts Down Accounts Attempting To Evade Donald Trump Ban From “NDTV News – World-news”



Donald Trump was banned from Twitter, where he had more than 88 million followers. (File)Twitter Inc suspended several accounts this week that were set up to share statements from a new part of former U.S. President Donald Trump’s website, saying they broke its rules against evading an account ban.Trump was banned from Twitter, where he had more than 88 million followers, and multiple other social media platforms following the deadly Jan. 6 siege of the U.S. Capitol by his supporters.On Tuesday, a page was added to Trump’s site, dubbed “From the Desk of Donald J. Trump,” where he posts messages that can be shared by his audience to both Twitter and Facebook.”As stated in our ban evasion policy, we’ll take enforcement action on accounts whose apparent intent is to replace or promote content affiliated with a suspended account,” a Twitter spokesman said in a statement.A Trump representative said they had nothing to do with the suspended accounts, which included @DJTDesk, @DJTrumpDesk, @DeskofDJT and @DeskOfTrump1.Twitter, which has said that its ban on Trump is permanent even if he runs for office again, has said users can share content from the Trump page as long as it does not fall foul of its ban evasion rules.On Wednesday, Facebook Inc’s oversight board upheld Facebook’s suspension of Trump but said the company should not have made it indefinite. The board gave Facebook six months to decide a proportionate response.Trump plans to launch his own social media platform, an adviser has said.(This story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)







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Liz Cheney, Donald Trump feud gets mixed reviews in Wyoming From “World News Headlines, Latest International News, World Breaking News – Times of India”



Donald Trump. AP PhotoCHEYENNE: As Republicans in Washington turn up the heat on Rep. Liz Cheney, the defiant third-term congresswoman faces mixed reviews at home. So far, Wyoming’s governor and congressional delegation have avoided sticking out their necks for Cheney, who faces ouster from House GOP leadership over her frequent criticism of former President Donald Trump. But she maintains considerable Republican support in the state, with a string of prominent former lawmakers recently rallying to her defense. Gov. Mark Gordon deflected Thursday when asked if Cheney deserves removal as House GOP conference chairwoman for countering Trump’s repeated lies that voter fraud cost him the election. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi and Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer “are the real threats to Wyoming,” he said. Gordon said in a statement he will work with Wyoming’s congressional delegates regardless of what the House does. Gordon had supported Cheney just three months ago, calling her a “key part of our delegation’s stature” and saying her GOP leadership job was “increasingly essential” to countering President Joe Biden’s agenda. Cheney was among 10 Republicans in the House to vote for Trump’s impeachment on charges that he incited the mob that attacked the US Capitol early this year. As conference chairwoman, the No. 3 House GOP leadership job, she is tasked with coordinating Republican messaging. Instead, she has found herself increasingly at odds with most of her party as Trump keeps insisting, without credible evidence, that fraud kept him from reelection. Cheney survived a leadership vote in February, but Republicans in the House are preparing for another next week, with Rep. Elise Stefanik, R-N.Y., emerging as a top candidate to replace her. Despite the political risk facing Cheney, Wyoming’s two Republican senators, John Barrasso and Cynthia Lummis, weren’t riding to her defense, either. The Wyoming delegation doesn’t always agree except on countering the Biden administration, Barrasso said in a statement when asked about Cheney’s situation. He didn’t answer a question about why he didn’t join her in disputing Trump’s false claims that fraud deprived him of victory. Lummis, who was Wyoming’s congresswoman for four terms before Cheney, didn’t respond at all when asked if she would stand up for Cheney. Political peril hasn’t kept Cheney from doubling down, in a Washington Post editorial Wednesday, on saying Republicans should reject Trump’s false claims and support appointment of a bipartisan commission to investigate the Jan. 6 Capitol attack. Meanwhile, some other well-known Wyoming Republicans have spoken up in Cheney’s defense, including former U.S. Sen. Alan Simpson, former state Rep. Tim Stubson and former state GOP Chairman Matt Micheli. She’s already facing four primary challengers next year, however, including state Sen. Anthony Bouchard, of Cheyenne, and state Rep. Chuck Gray, of Casper. “Liz Cheney should be kicked out of leadership – this vote should be held immediately. And our campaign for Congress will kick her out of office!,” Gray tweeted Tuesday. FacebookTwitterLinkedinEMail







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Facebook Has Six Months To Determine If Donald Trump Returns From “NDTV News – World-news”



Facebook oversight board said company was right to ban Trump after the Jan 6 storming of the US CapitolFacebook oversight board on Wednesday upheld the company’s suspension of former US President Donald Trump but said the company was wrong to make the suspension indefinite and gave it six months to determine a “proportionate response.”Trump called the decision and his banning across tech platforms “a total disgrace” and said the companies would “pay a political price.”The much-awaited board verdict has been watched for signals on how the world’s largest social media company will treat rule-breaking political leaders in the future, a key area of controversy for online platforms.The board, created by Facebook to rule on a small slice of its content decisions, said the company was right to ban Trump following the Jan. 6 storming of the U.S. Capitol by pro-Trump supporters.Facebook indefinitely blocked Trump’s access to his Facebook and Instagram accounts over concerns of further violent unrest following the Jan. 6 riot. It enacted the suspension after removing two of Trump’s posts during the Capitol riot, including a video in which he said supporters should go home but reiterated his false claim of widespread voter fraud, saying “I know your pain. I know you’re hurt. We had an election that was stolen from us.”But the board said Facebook inappropriately imposed a suspension without clear standards and that the company should determine a response consistent with rules applied to other users. It said the company could determine that Trump’s account could be restored, suspended temporarily or permanently banned.”Indefinite penalties of this sort do not pass the international or American smell test for clarity, consistency, and transparency,” said former federal judge Michael McConnell, co-chair of the Oversight Board, during a press conference after publishing its decision on Wednesday.In an interview with Reuters, board co-chair and former Danish Prime Minister Helle Thorning-Schmidt said public figures should not be allowed to incite violence or create harm though their posts, but that Facebook “can’t just invent new sanctions as they go along.”In its decision, the board said Facebook refused to answer some of the 46 questions it posed, including those on how its news feed affected the visibility of Trump’s posts, and whether the company planned to look into how its technology amplified content as it had done in the events leading to the Capitol siege.The board said Facebook’s existing policies, such as deciding when material is too newsworthy to remove, need to be more clearly communicated to users. It also called on Facebook to develop a policy that governs how it handles novel situations where its existing rules would be insufficient to prevent imminent harm.Facebook’s business has thrived during the controversy and its main source of revenue, advertising, has boomed as COVID-19 pandemic restrictions begin to ease in the United States, but lawmakers across the political spectrum have raised concerns about the power of Facebook and other social media, many calling for new regulations and some calling for breakups of big tech.Trump called the move “an embarrassment to our Country,” and added that “Free Speech has been taken away from the President of the United States because the Radical Left Lunatics are afraid of the truth, but the truth will come out anyway, bigger and stronger than ever before.”At a Financial Times conference after the verdict, Nick Clegg, Facebook’s vice president of global affairs and communication, said the company would hope to resolve the matter “considerably faster” than six months.Tech platforms have grappled in recent years with how to police world leaders and politicians that violate their guidelines. Facebook has come under fire both from those who think it should abandon its hands-off approach to political speech and those, including Republican lawmakers and some free-expression advocates who saw the Trump ban as a disturbing act of censorship.Facebook was one of a slew of social media sites that barred the former president, including Twitter Inc, which banned him permanently. Political leaders from German Chancellor Angela Merkel to U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders expressed concern that private companies could silence elected officials on their sites.At the time of the suspension, Facebook Chief Executive Mark Zuckerberg said “the risks of allowing the President to continue to use our service during this period are simply too great.” The company later referred the case to its recently-established board, which includes academics, lawyers and rights activists.The binding verdict means Trump will not for now be able to return to Facebook’s platforms, where he had a combined 59 million followers across Facebook and Instagram, His campaign spent about $160 million on Facebook ads in 2020, according to Democratic digital firm Bully Pulpit Interactive’s campaign tracker.On Tuesday, Trump launched a new web page to share messages that readers can then re-post to their Facebook or Twitter accounts. A senior adviser has said Trump also plans to launch his own social media platform.Wednesday’s decision marks a milestone for the oversight board, which Facebook financed with $130 million. The body has been hailed as a novel experiment by some researchers but criticized by those who have been skeptical about its independence or view it as a PR stunt to deflect attention from the company’s more systemic problems.”This verdict is a desperate attempt to have it both ways, upholding the ‘ban’ of Donald Trump without actually banning him, while punting any real decisions back to Facebook,” said a group of academics, experts and Facebook critics known as the “Real Facebook Oversight Board.”(This story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is auto-generated from a syndicated feed.)







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