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Water crisis ‘couldn’t be worse’ on Oregon-California border From “World News Headlines, Latest International News, World Breaking News – Times of India”



The water crisis along the California-Oregon border went from dire to catastrophic this week. AP PhotoPORTLAND: The water crisis along the California-Oregon border went from dire to catastrophic this week as federal regulators shut off irrigation water to farmers from a critical reservoir and said they would not send extra water to dying salmon downstream or to a half-dozen wildlife refuges that harbor millions of migrating birds each year. In what is shaping up to be the worst water crisis in generations, the US Bureau of Reclamation said it will not release water this season into the main canal that feeds the bulk of the massive Klamath Reclamation Project, marking a first for the 114-year-old irrigation system. The agency announced last month that hundreds of irrigators would get dramatically less water than usual, but a worsening drought picture means water will be completely shut off instead. The entire region is in extreme or exceptional drought, according to federal monitoring reports, and Oregon’s Klamath County is experiencing its driest year in 127 years. “This year’s drought conditions are bringing unprecedented hardship to the communities of the Klamath Basin,” said Reclamation Deputy Commissioner Camille Calimlim Touton, calling the decision one of “historic consequence.” “Reclamation is dedicated to working with our water users, tribes and partners to get through this difficult year and developing long-term solutions for the basin.” The canal, a major component of the federally operated Klamath Reclamation Project, funnels Klamath River water from the Upper Klamath Lake just north of the Oregon-California border to more than 130,000 acres (52,600 hectares), where generations of ranchers and farmers have grown hay, alfalfa and potatoes and grazed cattle. Only one irrigation district within the 200,000-acre (80,940-hectare) project will receive any water from the Klamath River system this growing season, and it will have a severely limited supply, the Klamath Water Users Association said in a statement. Some other farmers rely on water from a different river, and they will also have a limited supply. “This just couldn’t be worse,” said Klamath Irrigation District president Ty Kliewer. “The impacts to our family farms and these rural communities will be off the scale.” At the same time, the agency said it would not release any so-called “flushing flows” from the same dam on the Upper Klamath Lake to bolster water levels downstream in the lower Klamath River. The river is key to the survival of coho salmon, which are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. In better water years the pulses of water help keep the river cool and turbulent – conditions that help the fragile species. The fish are central to the diet and culture of the Yurok Tribe, California’s largest federally recognized tribe. The tribe said this week that low flows from drought and from previous mismanagement of the river by the federal agency was causing a die-off of juvenile salmon from a bacterial disease that flourishes when water levels are low. Yurok fish biologists who have been testing the baby salmon in the lower Klamath River are finding that 70% of the fish are already dead in the traps used to collect them and 97% are infected by the bacteria known as C. shasta. “Right now, the Klamath River is full of dead and dying fish on the Yurok Reservation,” said Frankie Myers, vice chairman of the Yurok Tribe. “This disease will kill most of the baby salmon in the Klamath, which will impact fish runs for many years to come. For salmon people, a juvenile fish kill is an absolute worst-case scenario.” Irrigators, meanwhile, reacted with disbelief as the news of a water shut-off in the canals spread. A newsletter published by the Klamath Water Users Association, which represents many of the region’s farmers, blared the headline, “Worst Day in the History of the Klamath Project.” Farmers reported already seeing dust storms that obscured vision for 100 yards (91 meters), and they worried about their wells running dry. About 30 protesters showed up Thursday at the head gates of the main dam to protest the shut-off and ask the irrigation district to defy federal orders and divert the water. The Herald and News reported that they were with a group called People’s Rights, a far-right organization founded by anti-government activist Ammon Bundy. Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and California Gov. Gavin Newsom, both Democrats, have declared drought emergencies in the region, and the Bureau of Reclamation has set aside $15 million in immediate aid for irrigators. Another $10 million will be available for drought assistance from the US Department of Agriculture. Ben DuVal, president of the Klamath Water Users Association, urged his members to remain peaceful and not let the water crisis “be hijacked for other causes.” The seasonal allocations are the region’s most dramatic development since irrigation water was all but cut off to hundreds of farmers in 2001 amid another severe drought – the first time farmers’ interests took a backseat to fish and tribes. The crisis made the rural farming region hundreds of miles from any major city a national political flashpoint and became a touchstone for Republicans who used the crisis to take aim at the Endangered Species Act, with one GOP lawmaker calling the irrigation shutoff a “poster child” for why changes were needed. A “bucket brigade” protest attracted 15,000 people who scooped water from the Klamath River and passed it, hand over hand, to a parched irrigation canal. The situation in the Klamath Basin was set in motion more than a century ago, when the U.S. government began draining a network of shallow lakes and marshlands, redirecting the natural flow of water and constructing hundreds of miles of canals and drainage channels to create farmland. Homesteads were offered by lottery to World War II veterans. The project turned the region into an agricultural powerhouse – some of its potato farmers supply In ‘N Out burger – but permanently altered an intricate water system that spans hundreds of miles and from southern Oregon to Northern California. In 1988, two species of sucker fish were listed as endangered under federal law. Less than a decade later, coho salmon that spawn downstream from the reclamation project, in the lower Klamath River, were listed as threatened. The water necessary to sustain the coho salmon downstream comes from Upper Klamath Lake – the main holding tank for the farmers’ irrigation system. At the same time, the sucker fish in the lake need at least 1 to 2 feet (30 to 60 centimeters) of water covering the gravel beds they use as spawning grounds. The drought also means farmers this summer will not flush irrigation water into a network of six national wildlife refuges that are collectively called the Klamath National Wildlife Refuge Complex. The refuges, nicknamed the Everglades of the West, support up to 80% of the birds that migrate on the Pacific Flyway. The refuges also support the largest concentrations of wintering Bald Eagles in the lower 48 states. FacebookTwitterLinkedinEMail







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Israel warplanes target Gaza as army says rockets fired ‘non-stop’ over southern border | Israel From “World news | The Guardian”



Israeli fighter jets have hit targets in central Gaza the army said on Saturday, after a day of deadly violence rocked the West Bank and unrest persisted inside Israel.Israel’s air force struck several sites, including a house in Gaza City where at least seven Palestinians were killed, according to the Associated Press and local media.Hamas reported the number of dead was likely to rise as efforts to recover casualties from under the rubble of the house on the edge of Shati refugee camp were ongoing. There was no immediate update from the health ministry and its spokesperson did not answer calls for comment.Said Alghoul, who lives nearby, said Israeli warplanes dropped at least three bombs on the three-story house without warning its residents in advance.“I saw the bodies of four people, including children, being rushed to the hospital,” he said. “I could not endure and ran back to my home.”He said rescuers called a bulldozer to dig up the rubble as they looked for survivors or bodies. Shortly afterward, Hamas said it had fired a salvo of rockets at southern Israel in response to the airstrike.The Israeli Defence Force (IDF) said barrages of rockets were being fired “non-stop from Gaza into southern Israel”, including a rocket that it said hit the city of Ashdod. Local media said the rocket hit a fuel depot.“This won’t go unanswered,” the IDF tweeted.Barrages of rockets are being fired non-stop from Gaza into southern Israel. Tonight, a rocket hit the city of Ashdod—see the damage for yourself.This won’t go unanswered. pic.twitter.com/2ByndSi79u— Israel Defense Forces (@IDF) May 15, 2021
Early on Saturday, the Israeli army said it had hit a Hamas “operation office” near the centre of Gaza City, with additional overnight strikes targeting what the military called “underground launch sites”.In a significant escalation in the worst bout of fighting between Israel and Hamas for seven years, heavy artillery fire was aimed at what the Israeli military said was a large network of militant tunnels. Dozens of Hamas operatives were killed in the strikes, the IDF said.Israel-Gaza violence: flattened buildings, rockets and communal unrest – videoPalestinian fatalities from strikes on Gaza stand at more than 120, including 31 children. About 950 people have been injured. The UN said 10,000 Gazans had been forced from their homes by the bombardment.Palestinians living in areas close to the Gaza-Israel border have fled their homes in pickup trucks, on donkeys and on foot. Some went to UN-run schools in Gaza City, carrying small children, household essentials and food.Hedaia Maarouf, who left her home with her extended family of 19 people, including 13 children, said: “We were terrified for our children, who were screaming and shaking.”The escalating tensions came as the US secretary for Israel-Palestinian affairs, Hady Amr, arrived in Israel on Friday as part of mediation efforts. Amr will hold talks both with Israeli officials and Palestinian leaders in the West Bank and encourage a “sustainable calm”, state department deputy spokesperson Jalina Porter said.The UN said the security council would meet on Sunday to discuss Gaza.The UN also said more than 200 homes and 24 schools in Gaza had been destroyed or severely damaged in Israeli air raids in the past five days. It also said residents’ access to fresh water could be limited because of power cuts and damage to pipe networks.Increased power blackouts were expected as fuel supplies ran low. Most families already only have power for four or five hours a day, and hospitals have been forced to rely on generators.Hamas and other militant groups have continued to fire rockets into Israel, where warning sirens sounded in towns and communities in the early hours of Saturday. The Israeli military said it had intercepted at least five drones carrying explosives launched from Gaza since Thursday.More than 2,000 rockets have been fired at the Jewish state since Monday, killing nine people, including a child and a soldier, with more than 560 people injured. Warning sirens sounded in towns and communities in the early hours of Saturday. The Israeli military said it had intercepted at least five drones carrying explosives launched from Gaza since Thursday.The fighting in blockaded Gaza, the worst since a 2014 war, exploded following hostilities in East Jerusalem, the Israeli-annexed part of the city Palestinians claim as their capital.Fresh overnight tensions hit the East Jerusalem area of Shuafat, where young, masked Palestinian protesters set debris on fire as Israeli police responded with teargas.The West Bank also saw fierce fighting on Friday, with the Palestinian health ministry saying 11 people were killed by Israeli fire.A Palestinian security source said the fighting was the “most intense” since the second intifada, or uprising, that began in 2000.Violence on Fridays in the West Bank is a traditional facet of the decades-old Israeli-Palestinian conflict, but the latest clashes are closely linked to the events in Jerusalem and Gaza.From Ramallah to Hebron and across the territory occupied by Israel since 1967, Palestinians hurled stones, molotov cocktails and other projectiles.Israeli forces hit back with rubber bullets and, in some instances, live rounds.Within Israel, an unprecedented wave of mob violence has seen Arabs and Jews savagely attack each other, with both synagogues and mosques set alight.More than 750 people have been arrested this week, police said.







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Water crisis ‘couldn’t be worse’ on Oregon-California border From “Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines”



PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — The water crisis along the California-Oregon border went from dire to catastrophic this week as federal regulators shut off irrigation water to farmers from a critical reservoir and said they would not send extra water to dying salmon downstream or to a half-dozen wildlife refuges that harbor millions of migrating birds each year.In what is shaping up to be the worst water crisis in generations, the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation said it will not release water this season into the main canal that feeds the bulk of the massive Klamath Reclamation Project, marking a first for the 114-year-old irrigation system. The agency announced last month that hundreds of irrigators would get dramatically less water than usual, but a worsening drought picture means water will be completely shut off instead.The entire region is in extreme or exceptional drought, according to federal monitoring reports, and Oregon’s Klamath County is experiencing its driest year in 127 years.“This year’s drought conditions are bringing unprecedented hardship to the communities of the Klamath Basin,” said Reclamation Deputy Commissioner Camille Calimlim Touton, calling the decision one of “historic consequence.” “Reclamation is dedicated to working with our water users, tribes and partners to get through this difficult year and developing long-term solutions for the basin.”The canal, a major component of the federally operated Klamath Reclamation Project, funnels Klamath River water from the Upper Klamath Lake just north of the Oregon-California border to more than 130,000 acres (52,600 hectares), where generations of ranchers and farmers have grown hay, alfalfa and potatoes and grazed cattle.Only one irrigation district within the 200,000-acre (80,940-hectare) project will receive any water from the Klamath River system this growing season, and it will have a severely limited supply, the Klamath Water Users Association said in a statement. Some other farmers rely on water from a different river, and they will also have a limited supply.Story continues“This just couldn’t be worse,” said Klamath Irrigation District president Ty Kliewer. “The impacts to our family farms and these rural communities will be off the scale.”At the same time, the agency said it would not release any so-called “flushing flows” from the same dam on the Upper Klamath Lake to bolster water levels downstream in the lower Klamath River. The river is key to the survival of coho salmon, which are listed as threatened under the Endangered Species Act. In better water years the pulses of water help keep the river cool and turbulent — conditions that help the fragile species. The fish are central to the diet and culture of the Yurok Tribe, California’s largest federally recognized tribe.The tribe said this week that low flows from drought and from previous mismanagement of the river by the federal agency was causing a die-off of juvenile salmon from a bacterial disease that flourishes when water levels are low. Yurok fish biologists who have been testing the baby salmon in the lower Klamath River are finding that 70% of the fish are already dead in the traps used to collect them and 97% are infected by the bacteria known as C. shasta.“Right now, the Klamath River is full of dead and dying fish on the Yurok Reservation,” said Frankie Myers, vice chairman of the Yurok Tribe. “This disease will kill most of the baby salmon in the Klamath, which will impact fish runs for many years to come. For salmon people, a juvenile fish kill is an absolute worst-case scenario.”Irrigators, meanwhile, reacted with disbelief as the news of a water shut-off in the canals spread. A newsletter published by the Klamath Water Users Association, which represents many of the region’s farmers, blared the headline, “Worst Day in the History of the Klamath Project.” Farmers reported already seeing dust storms that obscured vision for 100 yards (91 meters), and they worried about their wells running dry.About 30 protesters showed up Thursday at the head gates of the main dam to protest the shut-off and ask the irrigation district to defy federal orders and divert the water. The Herald and News reported that they were with a group called People’s Rights, a far-right organization founded by anti-government activist Ammon Bundy.Oregon Gov. Kate Brown and California Gov. Gavin Newsom, both Democrats, have declared drought emergencies in the region, and the Bureau of Reclamation has set aside $15 million in immediate aid for irrigators. Another $10 million will be available for drought assistance from the U.S. Department of Agriculture.Ben DuVal, president of the Klamath Water Users Association, urged his members to remain peaceful and not let the water crisis “be hijacked for other causes.”The seasonal allocations are the region’s most dramatic development since irrigation water was all but cut off to hundreds of farmers in 2001 amid another severe drought — the first time farmers’ interests took a backseat to fish and tribes.The crisis made the rural farming region hundreds of miles from any major city a national political flashpoint and became a touchstone for Republicans who used the crisis to take aim at the Endangered Species Act, with one GOP lawmaker calling the irrigation shutoff a “poster child” for why changes were needed. A “bucket brigade” protest attracted 15,000 people who scooped water from the Klamath River and passed it, hand over hand, to a parched irrigation canal.The situation in the Klamath Basin was set in motion more than a century ago, when the U.S. government began draining a network of shallow lakes and marshlands, redirecting the natural flow of water and constructing hundreds of miles of canals and drainage channels to create farmland. Homesteads were offered by lottery to World War II veterans.The project turned the region into an agricultural powerhouse — some of its potato farmers supply In ’N Out burger — but permanently altered an intricate water system that spans hundreds of miles and from southern Oregon to Northern California.In 1988, two species of sucker fish were listed as endangered under federal law. Less than a decade later, coho salmon that spawn downstream from the reclamation project, in the lower Klamath River, were listed as threatened.The water necessary to sustain the coho salmon downstream comes from Upper Klamath Lake — the main holding tank for the farmers’ irrigation system. At the same time, the sucker fish in the lake need at least 1 to 2 feet (30 to 60 centimeters) of water covering the gravel beds they use as spawning grounds.The drought also means farmers this summer will not flush irrigation water into a network of six national wildlife refuges that are collectively called the Klamath National Wildlife Refuge Complex. The refuges, nicknamed the Everglades of the West, support up to 80% of the birds that migrate on the Pacific Flyway. The refuges also support the largest concentrations of wintering Bald Eagles in the lower 48 states.___Follow Gillian Flaccus on Twitter at http://www.twitter.com/gflaccus







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Jordanian police disperse pro-Palestinian & pro-Hamas protesters marching towards West Bank border – media — RT World News From “RT World News”



Jordanian security forces used tear gas to repel a group of pro-Palestinian protesters who were heading towards the border with the West Bank amid a flare-up between Israel and Gaza, a report says.

Witnesses told Reuters that Jordanian police fired tear gas and shot into the air as they dispersed a group of about 500 young people, who broke away from a scheduled route designed to allow protesters to express solidarity with the Palestinians along the border.According to Reuters, the protesters were 5km (3 miles) away from a border bridge opposite the city of Jericho in the West Bank.Jordan’s Public Security Directorate (PSD) told the country’s media that security forces were confronting protesters, who had entered farms in Jordan’s southern Shouneh region and trespassed on “private property.” PSD requested the protesters to behave in an orderly manner.Jordanian Roya TV channel showed a video of riot police officers forming a line to stop people from walking toward the border. Thousands came to the border with the West Bank on Friday, carrying Palestinian flags and shouting chants in support for the Palestinian militant group Hamas that has been firing rockets from Gaza at Israeli cities.

Also on rt.com
Israel DENIES sending ground troops to Gaza as cross-border attacks intensify

Numerous unverified reports on social media suggested that some Jordanians managed to cross into the West Bank, but that has not been confirmed. Videos shared on Twitter presumably show protesters walking on farmland and going past what appear to be tear gas canisters lying on the ground.Israeli media reported that the Jordanians breached a police fence on their way to the border.Also on Friday, the Israel Defense Forces (IDF) spokesperson Avichay Adraee said that Israeli tanks fired warning shots towards a group of protesters that crossed into Israel from Lebanon. The protesters returned to Lebanon after tampering with the border fence and setting fires in the area. The IDF earlier reported that three rockets were launched from the Lebanese territory and fell into the Mediterranean Sea.Escalation between Israel and Palestine heated up on Monday, turning into street clashes between Israelis and Palestinians, as well as non-stop exchange of missiles.Think your friends would be interested? Share this story!







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Israel combat troops amass at Gaza border : worldnews From “World News”



They invaded Gaza 13 years ago and it hasn’t stopped Hamas launching rockets. For every Palestinian they kill there, they’ll make two more recruits for Hamas. That’s unless they plan in wiping out all 2 million people that live there.The world could and should stop giving Israel aid and selling them weapons. They started this latest round of violence, they are clearly not interested in peace or equality.







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Canadians fed up with ‘unwanted’ American border crossers who think the pandemic is a ‘farce’. : worldnews From “World News”



This article was last modified 5 months ago and may contain out of date information.The original publication date was August 7th, 2020 and it was last updated on December 17th, 2020. As per r/worldnews/wiki submissions should be to articles published within the last week.   This bot finds outdated articles. It’s impossible to be 100% accurate on every site, and with differences in time zones and date formats this may be a little off. Send me a message if you notice an error or would like this bot added to your subreddit.Send Feedback | Github – Bot | Github – Chrome Extension







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UN seeks proposals to end force on Sudan-South Sudan border From “Yahoo News – Latest News & Headlines”



The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously Tuesday to extend the mandate of the nearly 3,700-strong peacekeeping force in the disputed Abyei region on the Sudan-South Sudan border until Nov. 15.It also asked Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to provide recommendations for reconfiguring and ending the mission, although Guterres informed the council early last month that he couldn’t provide such options because of differences between the two countries.Both Sudan and South Sudan claim ownership of the oil-rich Abyei area. The 2005 peace deal that led to South Sudan’s independence from its northern neighbor in 2011 required both sides to work out the final status of region, but it is still unresolved. The U.N. force, known as UNISFA, has been in Abyei since 2011.The resolution asks Guterres to conduct a strategic review of UNISFA assessing recent political developments between Sudan and South Sudan and provide detailed recommendations by Sept. 30 on reconfiguring the mission “and establishing a viable exit strategy.”It “should prioritize the safety and security of civilians living in Abyei, account for stability of the region, and include an option for an exit strategy for UNISFA that is not limited by the 2011 agreements,” the council said.When the Security Council extended UNISFA’s mandate last November it asked the secretary-general to hold joint consultations with Sudan, South Sudan, Ethiopia and other key parties to discuss an exit strategy and develop options for its reduction.Guterres said in the April letter that joint consultations could not be held because of the COVID-19 pandemic so he held separate meeting with senior officials in the three countries.He said Sudan indicated a reduction in UNISFA’s strength could be considered immediately, “but should proceed gradually over a one-year period” to allow time for both countries to comply with a 2011 agreement on temporary administrative and security arrangements. It would also enable both sides to consult with the African Union and the regional group IGAD on successor arrangements, he said.Story continuesGuterres said South Sudan insisted that security concerns in Abyei and in neighboring Western Kordofan warranted UNISFA’s continued presence. “South Sudan rejected the establishment of joint institutions with the Sudan, arguing that previous attempts had resulted in two wars … due to a lack of trust between the parties,” Guterres said.He said Ethiopia believes the premature withdrawal of UNISFA would likely lead the security situation in the Abyei area to deteriorate — a view echoed by the African Union.Guterres said because of the differences “no options that would be minimally acceptable to the parties could be formulated.”The resolution adopted Tuesday expressed concern “about Sudan and South Sudan’s efforts to impede UNISFA from fully executing its mandate, including by withholding visas for police, blocking appointment of a civilian deputy head of mission and denying access to Athony airport, which would ease UNISFA’s logistical challenges, reduce transport costs, and enhance safety and security for UNISFA personnel.”It said the delayed deployment of U.N. police “prevents UNISFA from fulfilling its security and protection mandate and holds the potential to create a security vacuum in Abyei.”The Security Council urged Sudan and South Sudan to make progress in establishing temporary administrative and security arrangements for Abyei and encouraged the African Union and the U.N. special envoy for the Horn of Africa to intensify their mediation role to achieve those arrangements, which are stipulated in the 2011 agreement.







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Portugal border guards jailed for beating Ukrainian to death From “BBC News – World”



A Ukrainian jobseeker was beaten and asphyxiated by officers after refusing to board a flight home.







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UN condemns killing of Mexican border journalist From “World”



The U.N. Human Rights agency has condemned the killing this week of an online journalist in Mexico’s northern border state of Sonora







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Kamala Harris walks political tightrope in US border role From “World News Headlines, Latest International News, World Breaking News – Times of India”



US vice presidents always yearn for a chance to share the spotlight, but when Kamala Harris got put in charge of the Mexico border mess, she might have been forgiven for secretly wishing she could return to the shadows.WASHINGTON: US vice presidents always yearn for a chance to share the spotlight, but when Kamala Harris got put in charge of the Mexico border mess, she might have been forgiven for secretly wishing she could return to the shadows. Certainly the job is a high-profile opportunity to escape the notorious frustrations of being White House number two. On Friday it was Harris — not her boss, President Joe Biden — who held a virtual meeting with Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador. “We thank President Biden for naming you to lead all things related to migration,” Lopez Obrador said. And in early June, it will be Harris making an official visit to Mexico and Guatemala, likely beating Biden’s first trip abroad (to Europe) by about a week. So what’s the downside of running point on the southern border? The southern border. Few issues have as long a history of bedeviling both Democrats and Republicans as immigration and asylum on the approximately 2,000-mile (3,000-kilometer) US-Mexico frontier. And what was already a tricky issue became outright toxic under Donald Trump, who built much of his presidency on demonizing undocumented immigrants and touting the need for a large wall. So when illegal border crossings surged right from the start of his administration, Biden suddenly found himself in a perilous situation. Harris, he decided, was the heavyweight figure to find an answer. “When she speaks, she speaks for me,” he said on March 24. Technically, Harris is not meant to deal with the border itself. Her brief is to look for deeper solutions in the Central American countries where most of the migrants start from — the “Northern Triangle” of El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras. Figuring out how to persuade those people to stay home was the main topic of discussion with Lopez Obrador on Friday. But in reality, the public and certainly much of the Republican opposition don’t draw the distinction. One of the most frequent criticisms from Fox News and right-wing media outlets is that Harris has already failed by not visiting the border. “The Northern Triangle,” White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki said defensively in April, “is not the same as the border.” Yet to Harris’ critics, the damage is done. After all, she travels to many other places in the United States on vice presidential business. Why not to the sharp end of the crisis she wants to fix? How this shakes out matters more because Harris came into the White House on January 20 with an unusual burden: at 78, Biden is the oldest president to take office and his deputy, 56, is seen by many as a leader in waiting. Yes, Biden says he will seek a second term in four years, but he also does everything he can to boost Harris, who previously served as a senator and as California’s attorney general. “The president has given us clear instructions,” Ron Klain, Biden’s chief of staff, told The New York Times. “Our goal is to get her out there as much as we can.” Liz Peek, a contributor to Fox News, wrote in The Hill that the border role will doom Harris’ ambitions. “The odds of Kamala Harris ever being elected president are shrinking faster than a Creamsicle in August,” she wrote. “It almost seems as though Biden’s team was purposefully playing a dirty trick.” But Carl Tobias, a law professor at the University of Richmond, says Harris has “threaded the needle.” “Serving as VP has perennially been a difficult, delicate role because the vice president does not want to upstage the president,” he said. “Harris has seized this role as an opportunity to show that she can do excellent work on a thorny topic.” FacebookTwitterLinkedinEMail







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