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How Apple turned dongles into a big business From “International: Top News And Analysis”



If you bought a computer or a phone in the last five years, you know what a dongle is. They connect headphones to charging ports, laptops to TVs or card readers, and so on. Today, it’s hard to do many everyday tech tasks without them, which makes dongles a big business. That’s in large part due to Apple, which removed its headphone jack from the iPhone lineup and switched almost entirely to USB-C (now Thunderbolt 3) ports on its computers in 2016.Apple, Belkin and other accessory companies have created a huge market for these dongles, which is estimated by Facts and Factors to bring in more than $25 billion by 2027. But with wireless tech constantly on the heels of adapters like these, companies that once made most of their money on dongles – Belkin CEO Steve Malony said around 70% of its business was once made from dongles – are investing in the future of device connections.Watch the video to learn more.







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Steve Jobs, Apple emails reveal Facebook rift spans decade From “International: Top News And Analysis”



An email chain revealed by Epic Games as part of its lawsuit against Apple provides earlier context about Facebook’s battle with Apple over its App Store.Last August, Facebook said Apple’s App Store rules were hampering it from releasing its Facebook Gaming app for iPhones in the way it wanted to.Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg said the company had to remove the part of the app that played games — the point of the app — in order to secure approval on Apple’s App Store for iPhones. Now, emails between three former Apple executives, including Steve Jobs, from 2011 show that a similar conflict between Apple and Facebook was likely part of the reason for a delay for the release of a Facebook app for iPads over a decade ago.Tensions between Apple and Facebook over what the App Store rejects are ongoing. Last year, Facebook publicly accused Apple of using its control over the App Store and iPhone to “harm developers and consumers.”The exchange was published as part of a cache of exhibits used in the Apple-Epic trial, but was removed after it was posted.Apple’s iPad came out in 2010, but Facebook didn’t release an app for it until October 2011. Between those two dates, a Facebook engineer even quit in a public blog post, citing delays in the app’s release partially because of a “strained relationship with Apple.”In July 2011, Apple’s then-software head Scott Forstall sent an email to former Apple marketing chief Phil Schiller and Jobs. In the message, he said that he had spoken with Mark — presumably Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg — about the Facebook iPad app.He wrote that he told Mark that Facebook should not include “embedded apps” in its Facebook iPad app.”Not surprisingly, he wasn’t happy with this as he considers these apps part of the ‘whole Facebook experience’ and isn’t sure they should do an iPad app without them,” Forstall wrote.At the time, Facebook was turning its social network into a platform for games and apps. The most famous of these was Farmville, a game where users tended gardens inside their Facebook accounts.Facebook wanted Apple to compromise. Mark suggested, according to Forstall:Facebook could omit a directory of Apps in the Facebook app — not even links.Facebook could prevent third-party apps from running in an “embedded web view,” or basically a browser inside the Facebook app.Facebook wanted Apple to allow user posts in the news feed related to apps. Forstall wrote that those were filtered at the time, because tapping those posts would do nothing.Facebook proposed having tapping one of those app links in the feed switch the user to a native app or take them to the App Store if one exists, or otherwise link out to Safari, the iPhone web browser.Jobs, then CEO of Apple, replied from his iPad: “I agree — if we eliminate Fecebooks third proposal it sounds reasonable.”Three days later, Forstall followed up, saying he had a long conversation with Mark, and that Facebook didn’t like Apple’s counterproposal to forbid Facebook apps to link out to Safari.”But according to Mark, there is no obvious way to distinguish between a poker game and the NYT. Both are Facebook developers and provide Facebook integration,” Forstall wrote.Schiller, who was Apple’s head of marketing until last year and runs Apple’s Executive Review Board that makes calls whether apps will be approved by Apple, summed up Apple’s position.”I don’t see why we want to do that,” Schiller wrote. “All these apps won’t be native, they won’t have a relationship or license with us, we won’t review them, they won’t use our APIs or tools, they won’t use our stores, etc.”When Facebook’s iPad app eventually launched, it said it would not support its own Credits currency on iOS for apps like Farmville — a compromise along the lines of what Apple’s executives discussed.In recent years, the rivalry between the two Silicon Valley neighbors has heated up. Current Apple CEO Tim Cook has taken lightly veiled shots at Facebook’s handling of user privacy, and used Facebook as the example for a recent feature about asking apps “not to track.”Facebook has mounted an ad campaign to say that the iPhone maker’s privacy features hurt small businesses. It has also continued to tweak Apple’s App Store policies, criticizing Apple’s 30% App Store fee for online events in addition to its complaints about its gaming app.Facebook isn’t part of Epic Games’ argument in its legal battle against Apple and its App Store policies. The trial started on Monday and is expected to run three weeks.







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Apple Hires Ex-Google Artificial Intelligence Scientist Samy Bengio Who Resigned After Colleagues’ Firings From “NDTV News – World-news”



Apple declined to comment on Samy Bengio’s role. Samy Bengio did not respond to a request for comment.Apple Inc said on Monday it has hired former distinguished Google scientist Samy Bengio, who left the search giant amid turmoil in its artificial intelligence research department.Bengio is expected to lead a new AI research unit at Apple under John Giannandrea, senior vice president of machine learning and AI strategy, two people familiar with the matter said. Giannandrea joined Apple in 2018 after spending about eight years at Google.Apple declined to comment on Bengio’s role. Bengio did not respond to a request for comment.Bengio who left Google last week after about 14 years said last month he was pursuing “other exciting opportunities”.His decision followed Google’s firings in recent months of fellow scientists Margaret Mitchell after alleging she transferred electronic files out of the company and Timnit Gebru after she threatened to quit rather than retract a paper.Mitchell and Gebru had co-led a team researching ethics issues in AI, and had voiced concern about Google’s workplace diversity and approach to reviewing research. Bengio had expressed support for the pair.As one of the early leaders of the Google Brain research team, Bengio advanced the “deep learning” algorithms that underpin today’s AI systems for analyzing images, speech and other data.(Except for the headline, this story has not been edited by NDTV staff and is published from a syndicated feed.)







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Apple says it doesn’t want to be Android From “International: Top News And Analysis”



Tim Sweeney, chief executive officer of Epic Games Inc., arrives at U.S. district court in Oakland, California, U.S., on Monday, May, 3, 2021.David Paul Morris | Bloomberg | Getty ImagesEpic Games argued that Apple purposely locks in its customers in the first day of a landmark trial with Apple over the rules of the App Store.Epic is looking to force Apple to open up iPhone software distribution so it could use its own payment processor, bypassing Apple’s customary 30% fee on digital goods. A favorable ruling could even allow Epic to offer its own app store for iPhones.Apple is arguing that it built the App Store and gets to set the rules, which are designed to ensure that apps are high quality and secure.”Epic wants us to be Android, but we don’t want to be. And our consumers don’t want that either. They want the choice,” Apple lawyer Karen Dunn said.Epic’s argument is that Apple’s App Store is anti-competitive, and that its arguments about quality and security are essentially an excuse to exclude competitors like Epic Games’ title Fortnite, which was booted from Apple’s store last year after it introduced a direct payment mechanism.On Monday, Apple’s and Epic’s lawyers both made their opening statements, and Epic Games founder and CEO Tim Sweeney testified. The trial is expected to last three weeks.Walled gardenA core part of the debate centers around the relevant market that Apple allegedly dominates.Epic is arguing that the relevant market is iPhone app distribution. Apple says it is game distribution, and that users can easily switch to other phones and game consoles.To bolster its definition, Epic is trying to show how Apple works to lock users into its products, making it more difficult to switch to Android or other platforms. On Monday, Epic lawyers cited several internal Apple documents, some over a decade old, while arguing that Apple executives built a “walled garden” brick by brick.”Getting customers using our stores (iTunes, App, and iBookstore) is one of the best things we can do to get people hooked into the ecosystem,” Eddy Cue, current Apple online services senior vice president, wrote to Apple CEO Tim Cook in 2013, according to an email revealed by Epic Games.”Who leaves Apple products once they’ve bought apps, music, movies, etc!” Cue concluded.In another exchange, Apple executives discussed in 2013 whether releasing a version of iMessage for Android would make it easier to switch phone brands. iMessage is still exclusive to Apple products.”I am concerned that the iMessage on Android would simply serve to remove and obstacle to iPhone families giving their kids Android phones,” Craig Federighi, Apple software senior vice president, wrote in 2013.In 2016, a customer emailed Apple saying that iMessage amounts to “serious lock-in.” As part of an internal conversation about that email, Apple’s current head of marketing, Greg Joswiak, wrote to colleagues, “we hear this a lot.”Most recently, Federighi wrote to Cook about Apple’s sign-in feature which enables users to log into apps with an Apple login, saying that the feature is likely to “make our platform more sticky” in 2019.Epic also argued that Apple doesn’t need the App Store approval process to keep iPhone users safe. Epic contended that because Apple has sometimes approved low-quality apps for the store, its approval process is ineffective and doesn’t protect user security.In an email produced as part of proceedings, former Apple marketing boss Phil Schiller wrote in 2012 “Is no one minding the store? This is insane!!!!!!!” in response to a report of an “obvious rip off” app becoming the top free app on Apple’s platform.Apple doesn’t want to be AndroidApple Fellow Phil Schiller arrives at federal court on May 03, 2021 in Oakland, California.Justin Sullivan | Getty ImagesIn Apple’s opening statement, it emphasized that its rules have helped created a vibrant ecosystem that benefits iPhone developers, with more than 1.8 million apps in the App Store.Apple said that Epic made $750 million from the App Store, arguing that the trial is merely about money and that Epic planned this lawsuit and a related marketing campaign in order to use Apple’s technology without paying. Apple also said that Epic was looking at the wrong market and cannot show anti-competitive conduct in the gaming market — users can switch to Android, Microsoft Xbox or Sony Playstation.Apple also defended its “walled garden” without using those terms, citing its App Review department that manually reviews and approves apps and filters out “obviously malicious apps.” It said that based on its research, iOS represents only 2% of malware infections among all computing platforms.”Take away from the security particular to the iPhones and the bad actors have a field day. This is why Android security statistics are so much worse,” Dunn said.”We thought about the fact that the iPhone is a phone that you’re carrying around, you need it to work for you as a phone, and we cared deeply about the security of that device so it would be more protected and more reliable than PCs were at the time,” Apple cited Schiller saying.That’s why Apple doesn’t allow “sideloading,” or manual installation of apps, like Android does, Apple argued. If Epic wins, Apple contended, it would mean a less secure iPhone operating system.What’s the App Store margin?Epic Games’ disputed filing about Apple App Store margins.Epic Games/Court filingIn its opening argument, Epic lawyers said that Apple’s App Store generates large profits, with operating margins of 78% in 2019 and 75% in 2018.Epic cited Ned Barnes, one of its expert witnesses, who says he used internal Apple documents to come up with the calculation.The profitability of Apple’s App Store will be part of Epic’s argument that Apple uses its market power to extract excess fees from software developers.”We have documents, long detailed PowerPoints prepared for Apple’s senior executive team that lay out the profitability of the App Store in regular presentations given multiple years in a row,” Epic lawyer Katherine Forrest said.Apple disputes the accuracy of the number and has said that the company doesn’t look at profit and loss for specific units, instead looking at Apple’s financials on a higher level.”They’re going to pull documents out of context in this case. This is incredibly misleading,” said Apple lawyer Dunn. She said in court Monday that Apple doesn’t internally allocate to the App Store the costs of building the technology for the store, and that the company has an integrated business model.”Apple is concerned that analysts, investors, reporters, and others in the marketplace could misinterpret the public disclosure of non-public, unaudited financial information,” Apple lawyers previously wrote in a court filing.Apple’s App Store is part of Apple’s services business, which executives have highlighted to investors as a source of growth. Apple reported $53.77 billion in sales in its services line in its fiscal 2020 with a 66% gross margin (its fiscal year ended Sept. 26, 2020). Apple’s services sales also includes subscriptions like Apple Music, AppleCare warranties and licensing fees in addition to the App Store.







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Australia warns Google and Apple over app stores From “BBC News – World”



Australia’s regulator wants the two tech giants to open up their app stores to more competition.







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